Mike

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  1. How to Get Your Resume Past the System & Into Human Hands Does job searching sometimes feel like you’re flinging resumes and cover letters into a black hole? You may be wondering if your applications are being read at all. Perhaps you’ve heard that computerized resume scanners reject applications before they even make it into human hands. And yes—at many companies that receive a high volume of applications, that’s true. The internet has completely transformed the job searching landscape. Long gone are the days when you’d “pound the pavement” or “go in and ask to speak to a manager” for all but the smallest local businesses. Instead, you apply online—which is a double-edged sword for everyone involved. Because you don’t have to physically fill out and deliver an application or send out resumes and cover letters via snail mail anymore, you can apply to a lot more jobs. But so can everybody. This means that an open position can easily get far more applications than companies have the resources to read. Just ask Muse Career Coach Yolanda M. Owens, Founder of CareerSensei Consulting, who has more than 20 years of recruiting experience in a range of industries, including healthcare, tech, and financial services. When she was a corporate recruiter, she would post a job opening and get back, she says, “over 300 applications for an entry-level position within a week.” She was generally recruiting for between 15 and 20 roles at a time, meaning that she might have 6,000 applicants to track at once! So hiring managers and recruiters like Owens frequently use an applicant tracking system (ATS)—software that helps them organize job applications and ensure none fall through the cracks. If you’ve applied to a job any time since 2008, your application has probably passed through an ATS. Over 98% of Fortune 500 companies use an ATS of some kind, according to research conducted by Jobscan. Any time you apply for a job through an online form or portal, your application is almost certainly going into an ATS. But an ATS does more than just track applications—it can also act as a filter, parsing every resume submitted and forwarding only the most relevant, qualified job seekers to a hiring manager or recruiter. That’s the resume-scanning technology you’ve probably heard about. Luckily, getting past the ATS is a lot easier than you might think. Follow these dos and don’ts to create an ATS-friendly resume that’ll sail right through—and impress the hiring manager, too. 1. Do Apply Only to Roles You’re Qualified For ATSs get a bad rap as the “robots” standing between you and your new job, and when you hear that Owens read only 25% of the applications she received for most postings, it might reinforce that impression. But the reason she looked at such a small percentage of applications? Most candidates were not qualified for the job she was filling. And some were completely irrelevant. “If I’m looking at an entry-level [accounting] position and seeing someone who is a dentist or a VP,” Owens says, it’s totally fair for the ATS to discard those. So first and foremost, make sure you’re truly qualified for the roles you’re applying to. This doesn’t mean you have to hit every single job qualification or apply to a job only if you have the traditional background for it. Owens says she was always “trying to cast a wide net and not exclude too many factors to pass up a candidate who might not be traditional”— career changers looking for an entry point into a new field, for example, or folks who had impressive transferable skills. But if you don’t have the core skills needed to perform a job, you’re better off not wasting your time or a recruiter’s. 2. Don’t Apply to Tons of Jobs at the Same Company An applicant tracking system also allows recruiters to see all the roles you’ve applied to at their company. Owens often noticed the same person applying to every single opening the company or one of its departments had. When you do this, a recruiter can’t tell what you’re actually interested in or if you’re self-aware about your abilities. If a company has two very similar roles open, absolutely apply to both. Or if you have a wide range of skills and interests and would be equally happy in two very different roles, then you can apply to both, though you should definitely tailor or target each resume you submit to the specific job. But you generally shouldn’t be applying to both an entry-level position and a director-level position, or a sales position and a video-editing position. And you definitely shouldn’t be applying to every opening a company has. That just shows you haven’t taken the time to consider what the right role for you is—and a recruiter isn’t likely to take the time to do it for you. 3. Do Include the Right Keywords At its core, what any applicant tracking system is programmed to do when it “reads” a resume is the same as what a person would do: It’s scanning for key pieces of information to find out whether or not you’re a match for a job opening. “ATS algorithms aren’t that different from the human algorithms, we’re all kind of skimming for the same things,” says Jon Shields, Marketing Manager at Jobscan. So when it comes to writing a resume that can make it past an ATS, you want to make sure that key information is there and that it’s easy to find. One of the ways the ATS narrows an applicant pool is by searching for specific keywords. It’s like a Google search on a much smaller scale. The recruiter or hiring manager can decide which keywords to search for—usually whatever skills, qualifications, experience, or qualities are most important for performing the job. For entry-level roles, that might mean certain majors, whereas for a tech position, it might be certain coding languages. So if you want to make it past the ATS, you’ll need to include those important keywords on your resume. Hint: Look for the hard skills that come up more than once in a posting and are mentioned near the top of the requirements and job duties. Hard skills include types of software, methodologies, spoken languages, and other abilities that are easier to quantify. (The most important keyword could even be the job title itself!) Depending on your industry, certain degrees and certifications might also be important keywords. Particularly in fields like nursing and teaching where state licenses are necessary, employers are going to want to know at a glance that you’re legally allowed to do the job you’re applying for. If you’re having trouble identifying the important keywords in a job description as you craft an ATS-friendly resume, there are tools online (like Jobscan, Resume Worded’s Targeted Resume or SkillSyncer) that can help you. Note: In some cases, an ATS scanning for keywords will only recognize and count exact matches. So if you have the correct experience, but you wrote it using language that’s different than what the system is looking for, you might not come up as one of the most qualified applicants. For example, if you write that you’re an “LSW” but the ATS is checking for “Licensed Social Worker,” it might drop your resume. (To be safe, write out the full name, then put the abbreviation in parentheses.) Or if you wrote that you’re “an Excel expert,” but the ATS is searching for someone who has “experience with spreadsheets,” your resume might never get to the hiring manager. When in doubt, match your phrasing to what’s in the job description, as that’s likely to be what the ATS is looking for. 4. Do Put Your Keywords in Context Applicant tracking systems can recognize that a key skill or experience is present. But interpreting the strength and value of that experience is still for people to do. And humans want to see how you used your skills. It’s obvious to a recruiter when you’ve just worked in a keyword because it was in the posting, without tying it to a specific personal achievement—and it doesn’t win you any points. “Instead of focusing on regurgitating a job description, focus on your accomplishments,” Owens says. Plus, remember that you won’t be the only one adding those important keywords to your resume. “If [you’re] all using the same job descriptions and the same buzzwords, what’s going to make you stand out from the crowd?” Owens asks. Answer: your accomplishments, which are unique to you. When describing your current and past positions, “ensure your bullet points are actually achievements, and use numbers and metrics to highlight them,” says Rohan Mahtani, Founder of Resume Worded. Instead of just telling recruiters and hiring managers that you have a skill, this will show them how you’ve used it and what the results were. 5. Don’t Try to Trick the ATS ATSs have brought up a whole new host of problems with applicants “trying to cheat the system,” Owens says. You might have come across advice about how to tweak your resume to fool an applicant tracking system—by pasting keywords in white, pasting the entire job description in white, repeating the keywords as many times as possible, or adding a section labeled “keywords” where you stick various words from the job description. Don’t do any of this! Any tricks that have to do with pasting keywords in white will immediately be discovered because the ATS will display all text in the same color on the other end. So even if this gets your application flagged to a human recruiter, they’ll see that you added the full text of the job description or just wrote “sales sales sales sales” somewhere and move onto the next candidate as quickly as they can. Not only are you failing to prove you’re qualified for the job, but you’re also showing that you’ll cheat to get ahead! If you were considering adding a “keyword” section, remember that it lacks any context. If you can’t also speak to your experience with the skill, it probably doesn’t belong on your resume, and if this is true of one of the main keywords, this isn’t the job for you. What you can do, however, is include a keyword-rich resume summary—not an objective statement—that concisely puts your skills in context at the top of your document. You also want to be careful you’re not just stuffing your resume full of keywords. “You can use a keyword as much as you like so long as it’s used in [the] correct context that makes it relevant to the job description,” says Nick Francioso, an Army veteran who mentors other veterans during career transitions and the founder of resume optimization tool SkillSyncer. But if you just cram in random keywords all over the place, you might make it past a resume scanner only to irritate a recruiter or hiring manager with a resume full of nonsense. 6. Do Choose the Right File Type In the great resume file-type debate, there are only two real contenders: .docx vs .pdf. While PDFs are best at keeping your format intact overall, the .docx format is the most accurately parsed by ATSs. So if you want to get past the ATS, use a .docx file. But also follow directions (if the listing asks for a certain file type, give it to them!) and take the posting’s word for it (if a posting says a PDF is OK, then it’s OK). And if you’re considering using an online resume builder, first check what file type it spits out—Mahtani cautions that some online resume builders will generate your resume as an image (.jpg or .png, for example). Pro tip: If you don’t have Microsoft Word or another program that can convert your resume to .docx or .pdf, you can use Google Docs to create your resume, then download it in either format for free. 7. Do Make Your Resume Easy to Scan (by Robots and Humans) In addition to making sure that your resume has the right content for an applicant tracking system, you also need to make sure the ATS can make sense of that information and deliver it to the person on the other end in a readable form. Fortunately, ATS-friendly resume formatting is very similar to recruiter-friendly resume formatting. Like a human, the ATS will read from left to right and top to bottom, so keep that in mind as you format. For example, your name and contact information should all be at the top, and your work history should start with your most recent or current position. There should be “no surprises about where info is supposed to be,” Shields says. Among the three common resume formats you can choose from—chronological, combination, and functional—ATSs are programmed to prefer the first two. Recruiters also prefer chronological and combination formats (starting to notice a theme?). “For me, it's more about storytelling to demonstrate a person's professional progression,” Owens says. That story is harder to see with a functional resume, which can confuse applicant tracking systems, too. Without a clear work history to draw from, the software doesn’t know how to sort different sections of text. “Ultimately recruiters just want to find the info they’re looking for as quickly as possible,” Shields says. So making a resume ATS friendly will actually help your resume be more readable to recruiters as well. 8. Don’t Include Too Much Fancy Formatting It may pain you to hear this, but you likely need to get rid of that expensive resume template or heavily designed custom resume. “If you speak to experienced hiring managers [and] recruiters, they’ll tell you that creative [or] fancy resumes are not only harder for [an] ATS to read, but also harder for them to read!” says Mahtani. In order to scan your resume for relevant keywords most ATSs will convert the document to a text-only file. So at best, any fancy formatting will be lost. At worst, the ATS won’t be able to pull out the important information and so a person may never lay eyes on your nice designs—or read about the experience and skills that actually qualify you for the job. When designing a resume to go through an ATS, avoid: Tables Text boxes Logos Images: In the U.S., your resume should never include your photo. Graphics, graphs, or other visuals Columns: Since ATSs are programmed to read left to right, some will read columns straight across rather than reading column one top to bottom and then starting column two at the top. Headers and footers: Information in the header and footer sometimes gets dropped by the ATS completely. Make sure all text is within the document body. Uncommon section headings: Stick to conventional labels like “Education,” “Work Experience,” and “Technical Skills,” so the ATS knows how to sort your information. This is not the place to get creative with something like “Where I’ve Made an Impact.” Hyperlinks on important words: Some systems will display only the URL and drop the words you linked from, so don’t link from anything important (like your job title or an accomplishment). Instead, paste in the URL itself or link out from a word like “website” or “portfolio.” Less common fonts: Stick to a universal font like Arial, Helvetica, Times New Roman, Garamond, Georgia, or Cambria. Avoid fonts you need to download, which the ATS may have trouble parsing. Here are some elements you can use without tripping up an ATS: Bold Italics Underline: But stick to using underlines in headings and for URLs, Shields says. In general, people have been trained to see any underline within sentences as links. Colors: Just know that the ATS will return all text in the same color, so make sure your color choices aren’t vital to understanding the text of your resume. Bullets: Bullets are an important component of any resume, but stick to the standard circle- or square-shaped ones. Anything else could get messy. Still not convinced that you should ditch your fancy resume? To show how formatting can trip up an ATS, we created a resume with many of the “forbidden” design elements—including columns, separate text boxes for the job seeker’s name and contact information, a table, icons, and text in the header—and used it to apply to a job at The Muse. The resume contains all the keywords found in the job posting, and since Victoria Harris is a fictional person, she hits every single requirement, making her an ideal candidate for the job. Here’s what the resume looks like after it’s been run through an ATS: You’ll immediately notice that the columns have been smashed together. Victoria’s current position is still first, which is good, but what comes next is an indecipherable jumble: “Education Sales Cloud Apollo.io.” Then, the ATS has combined the start date of her current job with her graduation date and interpreted that she’s been in her current position for just one month instead of over a year. When you finally get to her bullet points, they’ve also been destroyed. Her fourth bullet, for example, now ends with: “Salesforce Analytics Cloud and Salesforce Sales Cloud Salesforce Salesforce.” Victoria wasn’t keyword stuffing, but it sure looks like she was. Yes, this feels like a lot. But the main thing to take away when it comes to creating an ATS-friendly resume is that “it will help even if you’re not going through an ATS,” Shields says. At the end of the day, what an ATS is looking for in a resume is not that different from what a person is scanning for—so if you make a resume that beats the ATS, chances are it’ll impress a whole lot of humans, too. Source: https://www.themuse.com/advice/beat-the-robots-how-to-get-your-resume-past-the-system-into-human-hands
  2. Switched to remote recruiting overnight due to COVID-19? Already been hiring from home a few days a week? While you might’ve recruited for remote roles before, you may not have done it 100% remotely yourself. That’s because for many recruitment teams, the hiring process is high-touch, with physical presence in the office preferred or required. But expanding social distancing measures means that’s changing quickly. To help you continue making valuable connections with candidates, here are five tips for making the most of remote recruiting—from video interviews to coaching your hiring managers to attending virtual career fairs and more. 1. Set up a booth at a virtual career fair When candidates can’t attend in-person career fairs or when you want to reach non-local candidates, consider a virtual career fair where you can meet and interact with hundreds of tech candidates from your living room. With virtual career fairs, candidates enter a virtual lobby and get the chance to browse company booths. When a candidate “visits” your booth, you can chat one-on-one, share details about your company culture and even screen promising candidates on the spot through chat and video conference. This way, even if candidates can’t interview onsite, they can still get a feel for the opportunity and work environment. 2. Get face time with your candidates Instead of phone screens (or turning off your computer’s webcam), try talking face-to-face with your candidates via video chat to get a better understanding of their personality, skills and passion for the role. Video interviews also make a positive impact on candidate experience, giving you the chance to visually connect with candidates you might not otherwise get to meet in person. As Katrina Dvorcek, Technical Recruiter at Indeed, puts it: “I believe candidates feel it’s more personal and the opportunity is more achievable when their recruiter takes time out of their day to meet with them via video (Zoom in our case at Indeed). I’ve received a lot of feedback of how appreciative candidates are that we communicate with them and keep them informed so frequently in this manner.” 3. Prep candidates for the remote interview process Interviews can be a make-or-break experience for candidates. In fact, 83% say a negative interview experience can change their mind about a role, even if they were previously interested. Make sure potential hires stay excited about the opportunity by preparing them for the remote interview process. “One major shift to my recruiting strategy is how to best prep candidates on interviewing virtually so that they’ll be just as successful and comfortable as they would be in an onsite, in-person setting,” says Shelly Bernell, Technical Recruiter at Indeed. She recommends giving candidates video interviewing tips in addition to any standard prep materials you usually provide. Indeed, for instance, compiled a remote interviewing guide for recruiters to send to their candidates, including tips on how to choose an interview space and test technical equipment. Beyond basic video interview prep, it’s also important to communicate the details of coding interviews ahead of time. Will candidates need to share their screen at any point? Download a specific program? Have a physical whiteboard ready? MeeJee Davies, Technical Recruiter at Indeed, explains: “I think the biggest thing is making sure that the candidate experience stays as close to normal as possible. For every single candidate that I had doing an onsite final interview, I did about 30 minutes of prep with them prior. I went over not only my typical technical tips, but also what coding/video platform they were going to be using, who they were talking with and anything else they needed to get ready ahead of time, like setting up a GitHub account early.” 4. Err on the side of over communication Since you won’t be able to meet your candidates in person, show them that their time and efforts are valued by laying out what the interview process looks like. Do your best to let them know two important things early on: when a hiring decision will likely be made and how much of their time you’ll require, including how many (and what type of) interviews they can expect. “I believe that committing to a transparent and communicative relationship with candidates throughout the entire recruiting process is essential,” says Bernell. “And even more so in a fully virtual environment.” If your candidates will be in all-day virtual interviews, check in regularly to make sure they’re comfortable—i.e., do they need a quick break to use the bathroom or get a drink of water? Staying in frequent contact is also a good way to collect feedback you can use to improve future remote interviews. Bernell continues, “Since I won’t have the opportunity to meet my candidates in person and escort them around the office, I make sure to briefly check in with them during the day as well as at the end of their day to gather any feedback on their experience so we can continue to improve our remote interviewing capabilities.” 5. Coach hiring managers on candidate experience If hiring managers need to continue to do whiteboard interviews, take-home coding assignments or pair programming, set them up for success. Will they need specific tools to interview candidates (e.g., HackerRank account, physical whiteboard, GitHub profile)? What should they do if they experience a technical issue? How should they be communicating with candidates during the remote interview process? Davies makes sure all interviewers are ready ahead of time. “Behind the scenes, I ping/email every one of the people listed on the interview the day before and make sure that they’re ready on their end,” she says. It’s also important to touch base with your hiring managers regularly to get feedback, review candidates in the pipeline, tweak job descriptions to include WFH keywords and offer remote interviewing advice. Davies explains that sometimes you have to get creative when you can’t just pop over to a hiring manager’s desk to ask questions or get updates (especially if they’re slow to reply to your pings or emails). “I couldn’t get a hold of a manager that I needed an answer from ASAP on a candidate,” says Davies. “So I looked at his calendar and saw that he was meeting with someone in three minutes. I know that person is always responsive via ping so I asked them to tell the manager to please respond to me.” What if your company has hit pause on hiring? If you’re in a holding pattern, continue to nurture relationships with candidates in your pipeline. Be as honest as you can about hiring timelines. If your company’s hiring pause is indefinite, tell candidates instead of leaving them guessing. Staying in contact with candidates helps keep them engaged so you can start hiring as soon as your company is ready. Staying connected while recruiting remotely Recruiting from your living room comes with its own unique challenges—but you might end up making even better connections in a remote setting. “I like to use the opportunity of working from home to focus on reaching out to as many candidates as I can and being able to increase productivity without distractions,” explains Palmer. “This also means I get to have more conversations with candidates—it’s not only great for filling roles but helps me personally to have more human connection while social distancing.” And while you’re trying to stay engaged with your team, in contact with hiring managers and in communication with your candidates, don’t forget to take care of yourself. “It’s been important to remember to take breaks to walk around, play with the dogs or meditate,” says Dvorcek. “Also ensuring that I set an end time to my work day has been critical, because it’s so easy to get caught up working into the evening if you do not remember to set limitations for yourself.” The post 5 tips for recruiting tech talent remotely appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
  3. Some would say working from home is a dream come true. Others might choose in-office over remote any day. But one thing’s for sure: working from home is a very different animal than “punching in” at the office. Especially as a tech professional when frequent collaboration, communication and problem-solving sessions with your team is key to a product’s success. It’s easier than ever for teams (and even entire companies) to stay connected digitally when working remotely. But with COVID-19, a lot of engineering and product teams may have been forced to adjust to a fully remote environment overnight. And whether you work from home one day a week or five, you’re bound to face a new set of challenges. No matter the case, the right mindset and strategies can help keep you and your team engaged, productive and happy. Whether you’re looking for help or looking for ways to keep your team together, here are six work-from-home tips, plus real insight from Seen by Indeed tech pros embracing the WFH life. Table of contents Introvert or extrovert, stay connected Communicate (often) and be as available as possible Clean up messy processes (+ invest in the right tools) Set up a dedicated workspace Get in a routine Ask for help How to work from home successfully: top tips for product and engineering teams 1. Introvert or extrovert, stay connected Working onsite leads to hallway conversations and exchanges with coworkers you might not normally interact with. And sometimes, those spontaneous chats or brainstorming sessions can trigger some of the best ideas. In light of COVID-19, the Seen by Indeed team recently transitioned to remote work. Michael Heath, Senior Product Manager at Seen says that his team is “extremely intelligent, opinionated and almost all introverts. In the office, they’re more willing to communicate because they can see or hear what everyone is working on.” But working remotely means that “now, they can’t. So that leads a lot of the team to be quiet.” Heath’s fix? Encouraging open communication to keep engagement high. So while working from home can feel isolating and eliminates any chance of overhearing a side conversation you can chime in on, try not to let it stop you from sharing thoughts or ideas (or touch base with someone just to say hi). Remember, staying connected doesn’t mean conversations always have to be work-related. Morning catch-ups over coffee and five-minute talks about weekend plans are often missed when working remote. But these interactions are part of what brings teams together, and a good chance to both engage introverts and reenergize extraverts with a dose of social interaction. Check in with each other regularly over Slack or Hangouts, or set up a Discord server where people can pop in for quick conversations. Schedule lunches or team-building activities over video chat. Start a virtual happy hour. Share photos of your pets. And while you can use a tool like Zoom for an audio-only call, make it a point to turn the camera on more often than not for some face time. 2. Communicate (often) and be as available as possible You’re not working side-by-side anymore, which means tapping each other with questions and ideas isn’t as easy as swivelling your chair around—you have to make it a point to stay in touch. “We’ve had to become much more deliberate about communicating with each other. When we were right next to each other, it was much easier to do small things, but over text little details can easily be missed,” explains Heath. “So we’re having to be a bit more formal in requirements and follow questions.” To solve communication challenges, Heath over-communicates everything. “This can come across a little annoying, but it fixes a lot of problems right out of the gate.” So while communicating more often when working remotely might feel excessive, it’s often essential. Mitchell Breinholt, Data Analytics and Operations Team Lead at Seen recommends having one place where everyone can get together and cross-collaborate versus having 20 different conversations going at once. He also increased the number of weekly stand ups for his team, scheduling an extra Slack convo to the mix. Join Seen for free to get tailored advice from a career coach (and a resume review) to help you along your path Another part of communicating is being as responsive as you can in your WFH situation (though sometimes time zones, kids, appointments will get in the way). Will your team get a timely response from you should they need it? Say a bug surfaces for a big chunk of your users—the last thing you’d want to be is MIA for too long if you’re the one responsible for finding a solution. But while staying in touch remotely can be a challenge (especially for those making a transition to it), Breinholt finds that meeting with teams he doesn’t normally meet with is easier. Why? Because there’s no dependency on physical places. Plus, extra schedule flexibility means you can adjust your schedule to accommodate another’s, if needed. 3. Clean up messy processes (+ invest in the right tools) The right tools will mean something different for every individual, team and company. But a good starting point is looking at what you already use and asking if it’ll work in a remote environment, too. Even if the tools you use work just fine, should you rethink your current processes or invest in an add-on or feature better suited for remote work? Wildbit’s remote-first team, for example, thought about ways they could optimize Slack for daily stand-up meetings. Its team was looking for a “lightweight, useful and more frequent way to check in with each other as a whole team,” but they also “wanted to make it a useful planning tool for individual work as well.” The solution? A stand-up bot built for Slack, Geekbot. “We set up Geekbot to ask each team member (product, design, engineering, and QA—we’re all in this) a set of questions at 9 am in their time zone” so that “each team member [could] use these questions to be thoughtful about their days and what they want to accomplish.” Through trial and error, Wildbit adapted the questions to their needs. Doing this helps the team plan their day and troubleshoot things that went wrong the day prior. And in place of weekly hour-long meetings to talk about what everyone is working on, they “can have focused 30-minute sessions in [their] project teams every Monday [to] solve problems and address issues that came up during the week.” Or, maybe you have processes that can be streamlined. When working onsite, Heath’s team was “using sticky notes on a whiteboard for general tracking of ideas and planning,” and going fully remote meant coming up with a new way for the entire team to easily access and track these ideas and projects from home. His team already used Jira, but it needed tweaking. This means that Heath “had to go in and clean a lot of [Jira] up” to allow his team to ideate and track projects more effectively. 4. Set up a dedicated workspace While slinking onto your couch (or staying in bed altogether) might be your first instinct, setting up a dedicated workspace in your home is one of the first things you should do. This will help you shift your mindset into productivity mode and create boundaries between your home and work life. Create a quiet and organized space that allows you to focus and think creatively (and jump onto a short-notice video chat, if needed). Minimize distractions by setting up shop in a separate room away from high-traffic or noisy spaces, and ask any family members or roommates to avoid that area during working hours. Short a home office essential or two? Find out what your company will provide, like a monitor, charging cable or headset, for instance. Another option is to ask your employer if they offer a work-from-home reimbursement benefit to help get you what you need to create a comfortable space, like a standing desk or a pair of monitors. 5. Get in a routine Falling out of a routine is far easier when working from home, so do your best to stick to a daily schedule. Structuring your day can keep you on track, plus create a clear transition between personal and work life. Not only that, but it can help you mentally prepare in the mornings and recharge after a long day of coding or debugging. Wake up at the same time you would if you were commuting to the office (or at least the same time every day). Schedule a dedicated lunch break, along with any other mid-day breaks to rest your mind and eyes. Switch off when the day is done rather than working that extra hour because you don’t have any evening plans. Other helpful tips: Get dressed (like you would for work). This helps you shift into a work mindset, increase productivity and create boundaries. Prepare healthy meals and snacks. Eating foods that fuel your body and mind can ward off hunger and keep you energized. Minimize distractions. Invest in noise-canceling headphones to drown out unwanted noise. Or place your phone in a far away spot if you know it’ll break your focus more often than not. Actually take breaks. Set a timer if you need to. Try the Pomodoro technique where you’d work for 25 minutes, then break for five minutes. Do that four times to earn a longer 15- to 30-minute break. Here’s an online timer you can try. When you do take breaks, step away from your workstation to get your body moving by taking your dog on a quick walk or doing some light stretching. 6. Ask for help Everyone responds to remote work differently. Not only can it be difficult to overcome initial hurdles, but the challenges of working remotely can come with its own set of mental health risks. Know when you’re struggling (and with what) and keep an open line of communication with people who can help. If you’re feeling overloaded, tell your manager before it affects your wellbeing or productivity. Feeling isolated? Don’t wait to connect with a team member you can count on. This can also mean reaching out for professional help. Check with your employer to see if there’s an employee assistance program that can offer 1:1 guidance, or contact a health professional to explore the right solution for you. Some companies even offer employees free access to mental health and meditation apps like Headspace or Calm. Make working from home work for you Working from home has a learning curve, but a positive mindset, the right tools and plenty of communication can alleviate some of the issues tied to working remotely. Because there’s no perfect solution for everyone, one of the first steps is understanding how you do your best work (and stay healthy). Need a quiet space? Most productive in the early morning? Can count on a short walk for an afternoon pick-me-up? Use this insight so you can tailor your WFH situation for you. The post Product and engineering pros share top tips for working from home appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
  4. This was originally on the Indeed blog. Paul Wolfe is the SVP of Human Resources at Indeed. For COVID-19 job seeker and employer resources, visit the Indeed Career Guide. A challenge like the coronavirus is unprecedented in modern times. Who would have thought even two weeks ago that we would all be where we are now, with borders closed, city centers in lockdown, and many people facing uncertainty over their jobs and businesses? Things are changing by the minute, and how long the situation will continue, we don’t know. The daily norms of business, government, and education are all being disrupted; there are no precedents or models on which to base decisions. And as the coronavirus spreads, it presents challenges for everyone. Clearly, it’s only together, as a community, that we will be able to find solutions and fight it effectively. In this post, I’m going to share some of the steps we’ve taken at Indeed, and how we can learn from each other as we make the decisions needed to keep life and work moving as we negotiate this pandemic. More than ever, everyone’s contribution matters. Moving to 100% remote work We first took steps on February 7th, within several hours of learning that an employee in Singapore was notified that someone in his family might have been exposed to the coronavirus. Out of an abundance of caution, we closed our two Singapore offices and asked all Singapore-based employees to work from home until the 24th. We also shared information about symptoms to look out for and established an email address for communications. As the situation evolved, so did our response. Knowing that we’re a global company and the risk of COVID-19 exposure only grows as people move from office to office, we at first asked specific employees to work from home, put limitations on business travel, and canceled all near-term Indeed-hosted events, then instructed employees in Sydney and Dublin to work from home. By March 3, when the coronavirus had begun to spread across the globe, we took a big step. We emailed all 10,000 employees and told them to work from home. It was a difficult decision to make. We had no confirmed cases of COVID-19 among employees and recognized that it would be challenging to many teams and individuals who were not accustomed to working from home. It also required us to make quick yet complex decisions so that we could continue to conduct our business, and support job seekers and employers alike. Yet we believed that it was the right thing to do; the safety and health of our employees was the driving factor in all the decisions we made about COVID-19. And since then, many other companies have joined us in having their employees work from home. In fact, more people are working remotely this week than they ever have before. Together, we are conducting a grand experiment in how to make this work on an enormous scale. How we’re supporting employees during this period Like everybody else, we are still learning how to do business in this new environment. Immediately we found ourselves faced with finding solutions to questions we had never considered before; such as how to change our IT support services from a largely in-person service to a completely virtual system overnight? How to make sure we had the infrastructure in place required to support the increase in virtual meetings? And then there were other questions of an incredibly simple but important nature, such as, who will pick up the mail while we’re out? Meanwhile we have put in place key practices to support our workforce. These include providing ongoing, open and transparent email updates on COVID-19 and supplying employees with access to our Employee Assistance Program should they feel anxious or isolated and need to talk to someone about their experience. Recently we have also started to offer reimbursable expenses for employees to use to create a comfortable work from home space. As we navigate these challenges, Indeed will be sharing resources across our channels to help job seekers find work and employers to keep hiring. We have already launched a resource for job seekers, and we will be sharing many more resources and updates from our own experience in the hope that it can be helpful to other firms. Sure, we’ll make mistakes along the way but the crucial thing is that we learn from them, and at a time like this, we can all learn from each other. No matter the job or industry, we’re all searching for solutions Of course, we are acutely aware that as a technology company, it is easier for us than for some others to operate in a completely remote work environment. However, no matter the job or industry, everyone is doing what they can. Many schools, colleges and universities have closed their campuses to prevent the spread of COVID-19, with some opting to continue the semester using online instruction. Retail stores are temporarily shutting their doors, while many restaurant chains are implementing more intense and frequent cleaning methods and temporarily closing dining or lobby seating in favor of drive-thru ordering or curbside delivery. Some grocery chains like HEB have shortened their store hours to ensure the best service and product availability for their customers. In the travel industry, online lodging marketplace Airbnb is allowing users to cancel their reservations penalty-free, and the three largest U.S. airlines have issued waivers allowing for flight changes and cancellation. Times like this, when we see everyone pulling together to find ways to stay productive and support each other, remind us of the larger picture; of how closely connected we are, of how much we rely on each other, and how the success of the larger collective depends on the work of many. Together, we can—and we will—beat this. The post Together, We Can Beat This: Indeed Responds to COVID-19 appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
  5. As a QA engineer, you have an eye for detail. You’re good at uncovering and fixing bugs. And not just glaring errors, but ones that are invisible to others. So how do you make sure your resume is equally as flawless? We talked to nine QA experts to find out. Here’s what they told us should be on your QA resume, from the most in-demand skills (and the best ways to highlight them) to your top accomplishments and projects. Plus, what you should consider sending instead of a traditional cover letter to stand out from the rest. Table of contents The tech skills employers actually want The soft skills you need to be successful Your top accomplishments (with #, % and $) Needle-moving QA projects Cover letter? Try this instead. The tech skills employers actually want Adding every technology you’ve ever worked with to your QA resume will only scare recruiters away. So according to Miguel Corona, QA Engineer at Indeed, it’s important to pick and choose the right ones to match the job description. “I always cater a resume to the job I’m applying for,” he says, “so the skills I include would be ones I have demonstrated that match up with the job req I’m looking for.” It’s also a good idea to highlight the QA skills employers want most. We analyzed QA job postings on the Seen platform to find out what those skills are: Industry standard tools (Selenium, Jenkins, Cucumber), programming languages (Java, Python, C#) and project management structures (Agile) top the list. If you know them, other skills to consider adding to your resume include API testing and security testing. As Kristin Jackvony, author of Think Like a Tester, puts it “Most companies are now using APIs to pass information between applications, so API testing is highly valued. I also look for some security testing experience, since application security is critical.” Manual testing, which involves playing the role of end user, inventing test cases and exploring apps and features to find bugs is another key skill to mention. Kate Falanga, Associate Director of Quality Assurance at Code and Theory, explains: “A candidate might be fluent in 8 programming languages and 15 automation frameworks, but if they don’t know what is important to test then they aren’t as useful as someone who does. If you list out your ‘manual’ testing skills then I will have a lot more confidence in your automation skills.” A manual testing skill employers love to see? Chrome DevTools, according to Morgan Pinales, Senior QA Engineer at Seen by Indeed. “Being able to use the network, console and performance tabs to debug can be a huge time-saver and helps to point to the underlying cause of a problem,” she says. One final way to stand out from the competition is to add your project management software skills. Take it from Daniel Thomas, QA Engineer at Indeed: “From the perspective of a hiring manager, even knowing that a prospective QA engineer has experience with the project management software my team uses (ex: Jira) would be a huge plus when considering ramp-up time.” Be 100% honest. Only list the skills you feel confident answering questions about. “I have seen applicants mention their ‘strong SQL skills’ who can’t write a simple JOIN command,” says Jackvony. “Whatever an applicant claims they can do, they should be able to demonstrate in an interview.” The soft skills you need to be successful Hard data tells us that soft skills do matter. Some will be explicitly stated in your skills section, but most will be implied by how you describe your projects and accomplishments and the way you create your resume (formatting, consistency, spelling, etc.). So what are the most important soft skills to show off? We asked a few QA experts for their takes. “One of the beautiful things about QA at Indeed is that we are truly looking for specific skills or behavioral traits, and these can be demonstrated without extensive technical skill,” says Danielle Smith, Manager, QA Engineering at Indeed. “We want QAs that are organized, strong communicators, curious and detail-oriented in their approach.” “It depends on whether it’s a manual testing role or test automation. It also depends on the level (junior, regular, senior, etc.), but maybe the most important are critical thinking, collaboration, communication and enthusiasm for learning,” says Anton Angelov, CTO and Co-founder of Automate the Planet. “Soft skills such as leadership, collaboration or organization can give a hiring manager more insight into who you are and what you can bring to an organization,” explains Falanga. “If you are at the beginning stages of your career, this can help show that an organization can invest in you for the long term. If you are seeking more senior roles, these are the types of skills that can set you apart from other candidates.” Since collaboration, communication, attention to detail and creativity frequently topped our experts’ lists, let’s dive deeper into the best ways to highlight them in your QA resume. Collaboration and communication One QA expert, Mark Bishop, Director of Assurance and Testing at AccessHQ, says effective communication is by far the most important skills to demonstrate in a quality assurance resume (and the one that impresses him the most). After all, a big part of QA engineer’s job is to point out defects in other teams’ work. That requires effective collaboration skills to communicate bugs without causing conflicts. “Testers aren’t just testers,” explains Dan Ashby, co-founder of the Software Testing Clinic. “They work embedded in a team, on a project, that’s involved with building a product, that’s part of a platform, and they work in an office, that’s part of a wider organization. And of course, there’s the external communities too. So there’s lots of different skills involved in all of these other aspects of the role.” In your work experience section, talk about the times you’ve worked closely with a variety of different teams, from software engineers and UX designers to product managers and customer service. Attention to detail Quality assurance is all about attention to detail, from working through 200-item checklists one line at a time and ensuring each requirement is met to noticing that something is unexpectedly different in your app today than it was yesterday. But how can you show off this key skill in your QA resume? Pinales explains: “I would definitely look for attention to detail on a candidate’s resume, but not necessarily as a listed skill. I would use the resume itself as an example of the candidate’s attention to detail—i.e., is the candidate’s experience listed in a consistent format throughout the document (e.g., company names shown in bold, dates formatted the same way, role listed in italics, etc.)? Does the resume contain any obvious typos?” The details matter. And as Jackvony says, “If the applicant can’t organize their own work history well, I doubt they will organize their test plans well.” Creativity QA engineers test the functionality of a given feature to make sure it’s working. “But almost anyone can do that,” Pinales points out. “The real value a good QA provides in the testing process is in the edge cases—thinking of all the unintended ways someone might use an app or feature that could cause it to break.” That’s where creativity comes in. Show off your ability to see beyond the obvious by explaining how you’ve conducted exploratory testing in your past roles. Did you think outside the box to stress test an e-commerce website before a major event like Cyber Monday? Or come up with test cases to uncover design flaws by thinking like an end user? Your top accomplishments (with #, % and $) Just as you tailor your skills to the job description, tailor your work experience. “If a candidate is applying for an exploratory testing role,” says Ashby, “but their resume is all about automation and scripted testing, it won’t fit.” With that in mind, focus on your proudest accomplishments and quantify the results.“In describing their work, I encourage people to follow a why/how/what structure—why were they involved, how did they contribute, what did they achieve?” recommends Bishop. For example: Identified, replicated and resolved 200 errors during the development process, improving mobile site load times by 25%. Collaborated with product managers and customer service team to address software issues, resulting in a 90% customer satisfaction rating. Designed an automated test framework with Python/Selenium to speed up code deploys from twice per month to weekly. Struggling to come up with #, % and $ to quantify your achievements? Include details about the scope of your testing. “What kind of applications are they working in? Are there certains tools or processes they’ve mastered to execute their tests? Were they responsible for major software or feature testing? Do they mention what they used to organize that effort?” says Smith. “I’d look for clues as to how damaging a testing oversight or mistake may have been in their past roles, and therefore how thorough the applicant had to be in their day-to-day performance,” says Thomas. “These clues may be things like the size and scope of their user pool, the nature of their stakeholders, how business-critical were the features they tested, the complexity of their systems, whether their products are localized and/or internationalized, etc.” Focus on what you’ve accomplished: “Add details about your role and the specific tasks you have done—not the team as a whole,” says Angelov. Needle-moving QA projects It’s important to include projects that have hard metrics to back up the project’s success. “Familiarity with OKRs would also be a great indicator that the QA Engineer sees him or herself as integral to the success of the business as a whole,” Thomas told us. And according to Corona, it’s also a good idea to pick projects that line up with the requirements listed on the job description to prove your skills. Even if you can’t share the names or details about your projects, (due to NDAs, for example), there are still ways to add projects to your resume. “Talk about your role on the project,” suggests Falanga. “Details on how you added value on a project can be more important to a hiring manager than a catchy brand name.” Beyond impressive projects, show your involvement in external communities (e.g., public speaking, blogging, Meetup groups) to demonstrate your passion for the industry. Cover letter? Try this instead. First, determine if you actually need a cover letter. If you determine that you do need a cover letter, consider something a little more unconventional—especially if you’re making a career transition into QA. For instance, instead of telling the hiring manager what she could do, Pinales showed them. When she applied for her very first QA role at Indeed, she didn’t write a cover letter. In its place, she wrote a one-page case study about a bug she found on the Indeed website, including details of how she found the bug, the bug’s user impact and the changes that needed to be made to fix it. “This case study must have shown enough ‘proof of ability’ to interest the hiring manager, as it got me an interview (and the rest is history…),” she says. When it comes to your QA resume, do sweat the details Overall, recruiters and hiring managers are typically looking for three main things in a QA engineer resume: The right skills and experience (plus strong attention to detail) Fluency in talking about testing and its value The impact you’ve made to teams, products, users and the business And as long as you tailor your resume to match the job description, highlight the right skills (both hard and soft) and add #, $ and % to your work experience and projects sections, your resume will pass all the tests. The post What to put on your QA resume (according to 9 experts) appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
  6. In light of COVID-19, many companies are asking employees to work from home (Indeed included)—but just because no one’s in the office doesn’t mean hiring stops. In fact, hundreds of tech hiring teams are switching from onsite interviews to video interviews. You might’ve participated in a video interview during the early screening rounds of the job interview process (or if you’ve interviewed for a role in a city far away). Now, with heightened emphasis on social distancing, even final-round interviews are being conducted virtually. But being on camera is enough to make anyone nervous. You can’t accurately gauge body language like you can in person, for example. Coding questions can be harder to answer without a physical whiteboard. And with most video call platforms, you can actually see yourself, which can make you feel even more self-conscious. So to help you prepare, we’ve rounded up our top video interview tips for impressing employers, even if it’s through a webcam in your living room. Know what to expect + test your tech Don’t let technical and logistical challenges prevent you from making a great impression. If you don’t get this information upfront, ask the hiring manager how long your interview will be and how many people will be interviewing you—i.e, will it be a panel interview? It’s also a good idea to ask what video call platform you’ll be using (e.g., Zoom, Skype, GoToMeeting). Get to know the platform, including how to connect, share your screen, reconnect, adjust the volume, mute audio, etc. Lots of these platforms even have a “Join a test meeting” feature that lets you explore the interface and test whatever microphone and speaker you plan on using. For tech interviews especially, Peter Zejda, Director, Software Engineering at Seen by Indeed, recommends using multiple monitors, if possible. He also suggests a faster CPU, especially if you’re doing the technical part of the interview via video chat and screen share which, he says, “chews up a lot of CPU and bandwidth.” “Being adaptable is also a big point,” according to Gaurav Sanghani, Manager, Software Engineering at Seen by Indeed. “Lots of companies are just transitioning to remote interviewing, so there’s potential for various technical issues (both on their side and the interviewer’s side).” Prepare your physical space You’ve tested your tech and know how to use it, so now’s the time to get your physical space ready for the video interview. Set up your backdrop: A plain background is one option, but feel free to add some personality (without going overboard). This might include house plants, simple art prints or an uncluttered bookcase, to name a few ideas. Skype even has a background blur setting, so check if the video platform you’re using has something similar. Adjust your lighting: As Zejda says, it’s important to have good lighting “so you don’t look like a shadow character.” Experiment with lighting by adding a lamp, turning on more lights or opening the curtains, making sure the light source is in front of you so the interviewer can clearly see your entire face. Test it out: Do a camera test on your webcam to check how your backdrop and lighting appears on camera. For example, you don’t want a houseplant sprouting out of your head or your messy laundry pile peeking into the frame. It’s also important to keep your webcam at eye-level to avoid staring down at your interviewer. Talk with your hands? Make sure your hands are in the frame so your body language is captured more accurately. Don’t be afraid to cheat (on the basics): Have a copy of your resume, job description and any notes ready to reference. The great thing about video interviews is that you can have a “cheat sheet” that your interviewer can’t see. Put the top points you want to make and any important facts, such as the interviewer’s name, near your screen so you can see them. Note: Don’t look up answers to code questions during the interview. Eliminate distractions We’ve all seen the viral clip of children marching into the room during a live BBC interview. Do your best to avoid a similar scenario. Arrange a quiet space: Do your best to keep pets, children and roommates out. If they’re renovating the apartment next to yours or your dog won’t stop barking in the other room, there’s an app for that. You can also use a headset to minimize unwanted background noise and echo. Shut down non-critical programs and tabs: Especially ones that might unexpectedly make noises or launch pop-ups (e.g. Slack, iMessage). The last thing you want is for a notification to ding in the middle of a tough coding question or a cat video slowing down your connection speed. Ditch the pajamas Business on top, pajamas on the bottom? It might sound like a good idea, but just because the interviewer will only see your top half doesn’t mean you shouldn’t wear pants. Dress up like you would for a face-to-face interview. Not only does this show that you’re serious about the job, but it’ll help boost your confidence (and prevent any awkwardness if you need to stand up for any reason). Instead of plain black or white, or busy patterns (pinstripes, houndstooth, herringbone), try solid blues or neutral tones like gray or light pastels, as these colors typically show up better on webcams. Get comfortable being on camera Camera shy? If you were at an onsite interview, you wouldn’t stare down at the table instead of looking at the interviewer. So practice your delivery via video. Record yourself answering some common interview questions on camera and watch it back (Did you fidget? Make enough eye contact? Speak too fast?). Practice pausing a second or two after answering a question to give the interviewer a chance to speak or ask followup questions, since there can sometimes be a short lag in the video feed. Prepare extra questions about company culture In an onsite interview, you’d probably ask some questions about the company culture—but it’s even more important to ask these kinds of questions during a video interview. Because without actually seeing the office, you won’t get a true feel for the people and culture unless you ask. Questions to consider asking: What type of career development and training opportunities are available? Can you tell me more about your employee resource groups (ERGs)? What is the office like (open floor plan vs. cubicles, for example)? How does the company support a healthy work/life balance? What kind of emphasis does it place on mental wellness? What level of impact can individual contributors have on the bigger picture? How does the company give employees a voice and encourage good ideas? Whiteboard or no whiteboard? Will you need a physical whiteboard? Or will you be using an online IDE like CoderPad or a remote pair programming tool like Codeshare? You might even be able to choose your own dev environment and simply share your screen during the video call. Other companies might use Skype’s live code editor or Zoom’s whiteboard feature. Since every company will have their own style, make sure to ask about the format of your tech interview and the tools you’ll be using. According to Sanghani, double check with the recruiter on all software you need to have installed “as well as any settings [you] need to have set up (like 2-factor authentication) for the tools the interviewers will use (like GitHub, HackerRank, etc.).” Another popular tool for technical video interviews? Shared notepads like Google Docs, where you’ll be asked to write pseudocode (or code in the language of your choice) and your interviewer will follow along as you type. You might even be asked to simply use a pen and paper for diagramming out solutions and data structures. Remember, interviewers are mostly curious about your thought process, not necessarily if you get the right answer. Be prepared to talk through your solutions and how you could’ve solved the problem in a different way (optimizations, trade offs, etc.). Questions will generally be the same as an onsite coding interview—the interactions, tools and format will just be a bit different. “Because a lot of the tooling is really poor for online collaboration, really be ready to adequately explain what you’re doing and thinking,” suggests Sanghani. “Don’t be afraid to ask the interviewer to repeat themselves or explain something if the internet connection drops.” Get hired from the comfort of your own home The most important takeaway? Treat your video interview like an onsite interview, but spend a little more time preparing your technology, tools and physical space. “In general, be really proactive,” says Sanghani. “Unfortunately, there are multiple parties involved on the recruiter side, and what your interviewer, recruiter, sourcer and scheduler expect and deliver may all be completely different.” Continue to send those follow-up thank you emails and don’t be afraid to ask about what the hiring timeline looks like, especially in uncertain times. Who knows? You could apply, interview and start your new tech job all from your living room. The post 6 video interview tips for tech pros appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
  7. Today’s post comes courtesy of Mikke Goes Coding, a platform that helps beginners learn in-demand tech skills and leverage their coding and web development portfolio to start a career and achieve more freedom in life. Readers will find the best beginner-level resources, discover proven learning strategies and learn how to build a professional portfolio so they can land their dream job in tech. Learning tech skills is easier than ever these days. Helpful online and offline resources and courses allow anyone to upskill or start a new career as a developer without spending years in college. But while it is easy to acquire new skills in technology, knowing where to start can often feel confusing. With online courses, bootcamps, learning groups and books to choose between, finding the best resources to support one’s learning style can quickly overwhelm any beginner. Where should you start learning? What resources can help you upskill fast and avoid wasting your time and money on things you don’t need? And most importantly, how can you learn the right skills that allow you to land the tech job of your dreams? Depending on your learning style and on how much money you’re willing to invest, you want to narrow down which learning methods and resources are right for you. To help you get started the right way, here are the pros and cons of three popular ways to learn tech skills: online courses, books and in-person. Online courses Pros 1: Huge selection The most significant advantage of online courses is that you have a massive selection to choose from. Knowing the best websites for learning coding and web development, you can easily find beginner-level online courses to learn virtually anything. And as your skills improve, you can proceed to more advanced-level material to further enhance the skills you want to specialize in. 2: Self-paced learning If you want to learn tech skills while studying or working full-time, you need the opportunity to learn at your own pace. With online courses, you can access the material anywhere, anytime and on any device. If you have a busy schedule, you can dedicate as much time to learning as you can—whether it’s during the week or on weekends. 3: Flexible schedule Upskilling in tech is a great way to boost your employment opportunities. But it’s also a powerful way to prepare for a transition into an entirely new role or industry. However, when you’re working full-time, you can’t take several weeks off to attend a coding bootcamp or spend hours every evening with a learning group. Luckily, online courses allow you to find a learning schedule that fits together with your job. If you’re working 9 to 5, you can easily set up a weekly learning plan with dedicated time slots for online learning whenever it suits you best. 4: Affordable and accessible The demand for skilled web developers continues to increase faster than the average for all occupations. Hence, you could achieve a lucrative salary without spending a single dime on college tuition. Now, the best thing about online courses is: You can start learning tech skills at a very low budget—or even for free. Especially if you’re entirely new to coding, it’s a good idea to try a few different tutorials before spending any money on a paid course. Also, if you’re not sure which tool to learn and specialize in, free online courses are your best chance to try out different options. Join Seen for free to get matched to a role where you can flex your tech skills Cons 1: Lack of guidance and support When you start learning to code, you will have a myriad of questions to ask. If you have someone to answer them right away, you can save heaps of time and learn much faster. Having said that, one of the most significant shortcomings of online courses is the lack of personal support. Most courses provide a forum or community where you can connect with your fellow students. But it can be challenging to get a hold of the instructor or an experienced industry expert. 2: Difficult to check quality beforehand If you’re new to learning tech, the seemingly endless abundance of courses can quickly feel overwhelming. Every popular learning platform promises quick results, expert-led tutorials and a solid stepping stone to the career of your dreams. Hence, when you’re ready to invest in your first paid online course, how can you make sure it’s the right one for you? With most courses, you have the chance to watch a few introductory videos for free. Make sure you use them to meet the instructor. Do you like their teaching style? Are the lectures easy to follow? Also, remember to check the ratings and reviews from past students. And finally: double-check if the course offers a money-back guarantee before you purchase anything. 3: Getting stuck in a cycle With so many online courses to choose from, wouldn’t it make sense to take several courses on the same topic? After all, it could help to learn another point-of-view on things with additional tricks from multiple instructors? Although it may feel like a good idea, starting another course right after finishing your first one could harm your learning curve. As soon as you learn the basics, you should start practicing and applying your skills to simple programs, scripts, and projects of your own. Therefore, choose a course that covers the topic thoroughly enough. That way, you can start practicing with small projects on your own when you finish your lectures. Books Pros 1: High quality The biggest advantage books have over online courses is the quality factor. Any programming book out there needs to convince potential readers to make a small investment. And if the quality isn’t on point, the book will never leave the shelves. Typically, popular tech books are written by respected experts in their fields. Not only do they know the ins and outs of the topic, but most of them are trained teachers, too. Therefore, the content is usually easy to follow, including practical exercises and small projects you can build as you go. 2: Great for future reference When you’re new to tech, you want to gather a pool of high-quality resources for future reference. As you build projects on your own, you can speed up your workflow by using a familiar book for help. Say you want to learn web development and build a website project from scratch. If you can grab a beginner-level book from your shelf to find best practices, you can finish your website faster. 3: Easy to track your progress Having a book in your hand makes it easier to see how far you’ve come already. This is a massive advantage over online tutorials and courses where you go through video lectures and exercises of different lengths one by one. Thus, if you prefer to have something tangible in your hands to track your progress, using a book could be the right choice for you. Cons 1: Comparatively expensive The main disadvantage of books is the price. It takes a lot of work to produce and publish an entire book, after all. However, any quality product comes with a price tag. You are essentially making an investment in order to learn from the best. Hence, you want to double-check the content of any book you plan to purchase. You want great value for your money: well-structured theory chapters, practical training exercises and real-world projects to support your learning. 2: Size and weight If you choose to use books to learn tech skills, you will quickly have a small library at home. And while most tech books cover an entire topic thoroughly, you need a few of them to have enough material for larger, more demanding projects in the future. 3: Relatively quick deprecation A printed book is like using a snapshot of how that specific tool worked and was used in the past. But as the world of tech develops continuously, the information in books can deprecate relatively fast. If you want to make sure your book will be helpful and valuable for years to come, focus on books that cover the fundamentals of a specific language, for example. HTML, CSS and JavaScript are popular, in-demand skills for front end web development that have remained virtually unchanged for several years. In-person learning Pros 1: Immediate help and faster learning When you’re new to learning tech skills, you will run into problems and questions all the time. With in-person learning, you will have someone by your side who can answer your questions right away. In short: you will get just the help you need just when you need it. Moreover, you will hear questions from other students, too. They may be about essential points that you have overseen or didn’t think of yet. All in all, guided learning with coding bootcamps, learning groups or personal tutoring can help you learn faster. 2: Connect with other students easily Coding bootcamps and study groups are perfect for connecting with other like-minded students. You can quickly find people with similar interests, discuss difficult topics and find solutions to common problems as a group. This can help you grasp the bigger picture and learn different ways to solve problems more efficiently. 3: Allowing more creativity with projects The best way to learn tech skills is to build practical projects on your own. When you are just starting, they will be very small and simple, of course. But as your skills improve, you can tackle more complex projects and create useful apps, scripts or web pages that make people’s lives easier. With in-person learning, you can be more creative with your project ideas because you have someone to guide you through it. Therefore, it may be easier to tackle larger project ideas sooner than if you were using online tutorials or coding books. Cons 1: Price Having a tutor or a teacher to guide you will cost you money. Because essentially, you are paying for someone’s time. And when it comes to experts in tech, their time is valuable. Attending a coding bootcamp, for example, is a significant investment. If you feel like in-person learning is the best way to achieve your goals, you may want to try personal tutoring first. And if you want to save even more money, try to find a study group and team up with other students in your area. 2: Not available everywhere When it comes to coding bootcamps or tutoring groups, it may be difficult to find one in your area. Of course, it all boils down to the specific skills you would like to learn. 3: Impossible to check quality beforehand If you are going to invest $10 – 20K in a coding bootcamp, you want a fair return on your investment. However, checking the quality of a bootcamp can be tricky. How can you make sure the teacher knows what they are talking about? Will their teaching methods support your learning style? In general, in-person learning will require just as much effort from your side as books and online courses do. Hence, attending a coding bootcamp is simply a guided learning path where you have an expert to support you along the way. But it doesn’t mean it is a shortcut to landing your dream job. How will you keep your tech skills current? Knowing how you learn best is crucial to keeping your tech skills up-to-date. When you understand the methods and resources that support your learning style, you can stay confident throughout the entire process. Also, it will be easier to focus on picking up the right skills to boost your career. Remember, now is the perfect time to upskill in tech and boost your value in the job market. Although the myriad of learning resources may feel overwhelming at first, don’t let the opportunity pass you by because you think it’s too difficult to get started. Whenever you’re ready, go ahead and start with a free beginner-level tutorial. If you’re not sure what skills to learn, start with web development basics: HTML and CSS. They are easy to learn, and you can use them to build your first website from scratch faster than you expect. As your skills improve, simply be mindful of what learning strategies help you make progress faster. If you see an online course, a book or a guided study group or bootcamp that aligns with your goals, go for it! The post Upskilling in tech: online courses vs books vs in-person learning appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
  8. Only 15% of tech pros are actively applying for jobs, but almost three-fourths are open to the right opportunity. That means there’s a huge pool of qualified tech candidates out there. The catch? You have to find them. Sourcing passive candidates might be more of a challenge, but it can be a highly effective strategy—especially for those hard-to-fill roles. You can zero in on tech pros with the exact skills you’re looking for, which means a better match than you’ll probably find in a stack of resumes. And since the most in-demand candidates probably aren’t browsing job boards, they won’t be interviewing with anyone else but you. But where are these passive candidates? Attracting top tech pros is difficult enough, but finding them (and getting them to actually respond to your outreach) can be even more of a struggle. In fact, 35% of tech hirers say the overall time and effort it takes to search for candidates is one of their biggest hiring pains. In our new eBook, The ultimate guide to sourcing tech talent (in unconventional places), we’re looking beyond the typical sourcing channels you know best (e.g., professional networking sites, job boards, employee referrals) to boost your sourcing strategy and help you reach a wider range of tech candidates. Download the eBook to find the right people with the right skills (and build a winning tech team, faster) We break down where (and how) to find passive candidates on creative channels you might not have tapped into yet, including: Nine new places to source the tech talent you need—from GitHub to Goodreads How to tell if a candidate has the right education, experience and skills based on their online profiles Tips for narrowing your search on sourcing channels (even ones with millions of users) so you can find exactly who you’re looking for The right ways to reach out to avoid getting ignored, ghosted or flagged as spam Download the eBook to reach a fresh set of passive candidates your competitors haven’t discovered yet. The post [eBook] Sourcing passive candidates in unconventional places appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
  9. Diversity and inclusion isn’t just about race and gender. Other factors like veteran status, ability, age, life experiences and belonging to certain communities (i.e., LGBTQ+) contribute to truly diverse teams. And while all generations value fairness, belonging and respect, incoming Gen Z talent is particularly drawn to it. In fact, 77% of Gen Z-ers say that a company’s level of diversity affects their decision to work there. But diversity recruiting in the tech industry isn’t easy, even when you’re actively trying to do it. That’s why we recently partnered with PowerToFly to host a webinar on all things inclusive sourcing, featuring insights from talent leaders at Allstate, Dell Technologies and Gainsight. Hear what they have to say about the search techniques, sourcing best practices, tools and resources they use to attract top talent from all walks of life, build diverse talent pipelines and drive a sense of belonging. What is diversity hiring? Diversity is the range of differences that make us who we are, both seen and unseen (e.g., age, ability, race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, military background). Inclusion is how you embrace and retain that diversity. Does your company culture encourage multiple perspectives? Are you allowing diversity to thrive? Diversity hiring involves actively reaching out to candidates from diverse backgrounds to bring their unique perspectives to the company. Cyndi Cochran, Strategic Sourcing and Diversity Recruiting Assoc. Manager at Allstate, says “We […] actively seek out and leverage collective differences and similarities to improve business outcomes in our workforce, marketplace and in our communities.” Hiring decisions are still based on who’s best for the job, but the goal is to make sure a wider range of candidates are considered, regardless of their background. Tip #1: Set goals and track your progress “Good intentions and values and a mission-driven purpose are just not enough to make results happen,” says Carol Mahoney, Chief People Officer at Gainsight. That means you’ll need to have specific goals to work towards, instead of hoping a diverse set of candidates will apply for your open roles. Come up with one major goal + define what success will look like “Speed kills diversity,” says Kirby Traynham, Consultant, Sales Recruiting Programs and Operations at Dell Technologies. Don’t go too big, too soon. Her suggestion? Pick one metric and work towards it to iron out the kinks. Identify external partners, the right messaging, etc. to come up with a successful formula that you can apply across other roles and parts of the business. For example, one of Dell’s big initiatives is to increase female representation, specifically within leadership roles. The goal? Have women make up 50% of its global workforce and 40% of its global people leaders by 2030. Similarly, Gainsight set a goal in 2019 to have at least 50% of its hires and promotions come from underrepresented backgrounds. But if you’re just starting out, your goals don’t have to be quite as ambitious. Maybe your goal is to increase the percentage of minorities in software engineering roles by 20% within one year. Or increase the percentage of qualified women in senior-level roles by 10% in six months. Track diversity within your pipeline So how do you track diversity within your pipeline? How will you know when you’ve made some progress? The good news is that people are often willing to disclose their ethnicity/race, gender, veteran status, disabilities and more. Traynham even reports a nearly 100% self-identification rate during the talent acquisition process. However, if your candidates aren’t self-identifying, Traynham advises looking to what you do know. You can make some assumptions if they’re coming from a certain org, group or university (e.g., historically black colleges and universities, tribal colleges). You can also ask questions like “Where did you hear about us?” to identify patterns and gaps. Watch the full webinar for more inclusive sourcing strategies from our panel of experts Tip #2: Audit your jobs descriptions When you’re looking to source diverse candidates, your job descriptions are critical. Make sure they’re working for you, not against you. Watch your language Is your messaging inclusive? Research shows that the language you use in your job description might be turning off diverse candidates. Certain words are subtly coded as masculine (e.g., ambitious, driven, competitive) and some are subtly coded as feminine (e.g., supportive, warm, compassionate). Getting rid of these gendered keywords can increase the number of applicants by 42%. Traynham uses a gender decoder tool to help her reword job descriptions so she isn’t unconsciously discouraging certain candidates, particularly women, from applying. Not only that, but job descriptions that contain growth mindset language (e.g., strive, highly motivated, love learning) tend to result in more female hires. On the other hand, fixed mindset traits (e.g., genius, high performer, overachiever) discourage all genders from applying, but are more likely to result in a male hire. Drill down on must-haves vs. nice-to-haves When it comes to job descriptions, are you screening in or screening out? “Every time you put something on a job description—a requirement or a responsibility,” says Traynham, “you’re unintentionally or intentionally eliminating someone from applying and being considered for that role.” And when it comes to men and women, there’s a confidence gap. Studies show that women only apply to open roles if they think they match 100% of the requirements, while men apply when they’re only 60% qualified. That means if you list dozens of must-have skills, women aren’t as likely to apply as men are. To combat this, Traynham suggests going from a long list of bullet points to just 3-5 must-haves. Tip #3: Source diverse candidates where they “hang out” If you continue to rely on the sourcing channels you know best, it can result in a talent pool that lacks diversity. So get creative. Try a few unconventional places, like Meetup, Slack, Reddit and Facebook Groups to connect with a wider range of tech pros. Beyond online channels, Cochran suggests partnering with external organizations and student networks to get involved in the community. Search for networking event attendee lists. Host career fairs in overlooked communities. Recruit at schools with diverse student bodies and at conferences, events and in communities that promote inclusion (e.g., Grace Hopper, Afrotech, Disability:In, PowerToFly). Make sure you’re not only sourcing diverse junior talent, but also diverse senior leaders. A diverse leadership team will help attract additional minority talent and create career paths for all employees. The best way to do it? Instead of focusing your efforts on campus recruiting (which is best for entry-level roles), target professional associations organized around specific minority groups, since that’s where you’ll find soon-to-be leaders. Tip #4: Be more intentional with your search strings Start by thinking about what a good search result will look like and go from there. “When we’re doing search strings in our everyday practice, we sometimes take a backwards look,” says Cochran, “And say, okay if I’m doing this search string […] who are we accidentally excluding? And how do we work around that to be super intentional in evaluating the tools and practices we’re using?” Make your existing boolean searches more inclusive by focusing on the must-have skills. Break the mold. Open up your search to industries you don’t normally recruit from (e.g., finance, education, fashion). Revisit your education and experience criteria by looking beyond top-tier universities and Fortune 100 companies. Consider coding bootcamps, for example. As Mahoney explains: “I think that education biases often really paralyze our effort to look more objectively at candidates. [It also] provides an invisible barrier to different groups in being able to break through that whole hiring pipeline. I think one of the things that we can do is […] not have so much of a bias for certain schools and have a little bit more of an open mind about schools that maybe we haven’t heard of.” Beyond making sure search strings aren’t excluding certain groups of people (who might not have an Ivy League degree or lots of experience, for example), it’s also important to build diversity into your searches by adding keywords aimed at targeting underrepresented groups, schools, communities and locations. Bottom line: Cochran believes it comes down to influencing and advising hiring managers to open doors and consider nontraditional talent pools (and share successes to keep the momentum going). “It’s everyone’s responsibility to challenge some of those limiting beliefs that might be barriers,” she says. Tip #5: Encourage diverse referrals While it’s true that people tend to refer people like themselves, you can get great results if you’re more intentional about your referral program. The best part? All you have to do is ask. “The [conventional] wisdom is that employee referrals just bring more of the same,” explains Mahoney, “but what we found is that when you ask people to refer in the spirit of helping diversify and make a more inclusive organization, they will.” Pinterest is another company that found success by simply making the ask. The company challenged its engineers to refer women and candidates from underrepresented ethnic groups. The result? A 24% jump in the number of women referred and a 55x increase in candidates from underrepresented ethnic backgrounds in just a six-week period. Some companies, like Intel, are even paying out bigger referral bonuses for employees who bring in candidates from underrepresented backgrounds. Supercharge your employee referral program: The one question you should be asking your tech employees to drive better referrals. Tip #6: Build a strong brand that showcases diversity You have limited control over who applies for your open roles, but you can diversify your inbound traffic by upping the ante on inclusive branding. After all, diversity attracts diversity. Traynham explains: “I almost look at inclusive sourcing as attraction. How can I attract the talent to the opportunities we have here? And I think first it really starts with brand. What is the brand that […] you’re putting out there? And what are some of the stories we can share on a career site […] that are going to help to build that overall picture? So that then when you reach out to the individuals, they have that perspective and mindset already and they’re more inclined to respond.” Can a wide range of candidates see themselves at your company? Show off your existing workplace diversity on your website and social profiles. Add diversity content to your careers page, including a diversity mission statement. Create diversity recruitment videos. Write stories about the work you’re doing to foster diversity and inclusion on your company’s blog. Use real photos of your team at work, instead of stock photos. When it comes to employee benefits and perks, make sure you’re highlighting ones that appeal to different kinds of people. For example, free beer and video games might appeal to a different group than a generous parental leave policy and 401(k) match. Tip #7: Get your employee resource groups (ERGs) involved Employee resource groups (ERGs) are employee-led communities centered around a shared identity, interest and/or background (race, gender, ability, sexual orientation, etc.). Dell, for example, has 13 ERGs, including Asians in Action, Pride, True Ability, Black Networking Alliance and more. These groups can help with diversity recruiting in a few ways: New sourcing strategies: ERGs can help you identify previously untapped sourcing channels, including minority associations, niche forums, diverse job boards and more. Branding: According to Mahoney, ERGs at Gainsight critique how the company shows up on its website to make sure it’s welcoming and inclusive. ERGs also help improve the candidate experience at Gainsight and increase engagement in the interview process. Leadership buy-in: Inclusion efforts increase by having more leaders actively involved in the company’s diversity strategy. But getting them on board isn’t always easy. That’s where ERGs come in. Traynham says ERGs can support your conversation with a hiring leader to achieve buy-in. It just takes one hire to make it easier. Diversity training: Dell, for instance, is working with its ERGs to come up with a training for hiring managers on how much information to include in job descriptions. ERGs at Dell also conduct training on using pronouns and gender-inclusive language. At Allstate, there’s ERG-guided knowledge sharing opportunities not just for leaders, but for individual contributors on topics like unconscious bias. Diversity’s not just another box to check Diversity and inclusion can be challenging to implement (or improve upon) with obstacles like the tech skills gap, intense competition for talent, cultural mismatches, a homogenous pipeline and unconscious biases. But when it comes down to it, people are looking for places where they belong. The more open companies can be, the more comfortable employees will be bringing their whole selves to work. First and foremost, diversity hiring has to be intentional. And it’s everyone’s responsibility, not just the CEO and not just HR. As Cochran puts it, “[Inclusive sourcing] requires everyone to be invested and ultimately accountable from the start of the candidate attraction through employment and beyond.” There’s no one-size-fits-all solution for diversity sourcing. But make it clear that diversity and inclusion is a priority for you, set measurable goals and hire intentionally to see the change. The post 7 diversity hiring tips from inclusive sourcing experts appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
  10. Whether you want to advance your career as a software developer by picking up a second or third language, make the switch from data analyst to data scientist or break into tech, Python is a great language for beginners and experts alike. As a general purpose programming language, you can do almost anything with Python—from building websites from scratch to face detection to 3D game development. Even NASA uses it to create its space flight software. Since it’s one of the easiest languages to learn (and one of the fastest-growing tech skills), Python is a great starting point for your coding journey. And if you already know other programming languages, you’ll pick up Python quickly. Not to mention, you’ll stand out to companies that value polyglot programmers. So to help you level up in your current role, qualify for roles that better match your career aspirations, make a career change or whatever your goals may be, we’re breaking down the best Python courses to take based on your skill level, as well as the certifications that are available (and if you even need to get one). Table of contents First, is a Python certification even worth it? Beginner Python courses Beginner Python certification Intermediate Python courses Intermediate Python certification Advanced Python courses Advanced Python certifications First, is a Python certification even worth it? For many IT/sysadmin careers, certifications are valuable (certified professionals typically earn more than non-certified professionals). But for programmers, certifications are a bit more of a grey area. For example, if you already have an impressive GitHub profile filled with Python code samples and a track record of contributing to open source projects, a cert may not be worth it. Your code speaks for itself. But if you’re new to Python (or don’t have a lot of projects under your belt), a Python certification can help you verify your skills to potential employers. In other words, a Python certification can be a great substitute for education, experience and projects, but if you already have proof of your skills, a cert may not be necessary. If you decide that a certification is right for your career, it’s important to choose the right one based on your skill level and goals (and to get the most bang for your buck). In the next section, we’ll take a look at what online courses are out there, plus the certifications you should consider based on your career stage. The best way to learn Python The best way to learn Python is by doing. If you don’t have the time (or money) to attend a coding bootcamp or four-year college program, learning Python online is a great alternative. There are tons of Python courses to choose from—some free, some paid. Here are a few online courses to investigate further, based on your skill level (beginner, intermediate or advanced). Beginner Python courses Never coded a day in your life? Want to brush up on the basics? In these courses, you’ll be introduced to basic programming concepts, Python syntax and commonly used packages for data manipulation, analysis and exploration. 1. Programming for Everybody (Getting Started with Python) Taught by a professor at the University of Michigan, this course will teach you how to write your first Python program. It’s a good starting point for absolute beginners as it requires zero programming knowledge. And as part of a Coursera learning track (Python for Everybody Specialization), you can continue on to more advanced topics (e.g., data structures, databases, data visualization) if you want. Cost: $49 per month with a Coursera subscription Time commitment: 128 hours total (Suggested break down: eight hours per week for four months) 2. Introduction to Python Unlike other Python tutorials, this course focuses specifically on Python for data science, making it a great option if you’re looking to move into that field. Starting with the basic concepts of Python, you’ll learn how to store and manipulate data, as well as how to use Python functions, methods and packages to conduct your own analyses. Cost: $33.25 per month with a DataCamp subscription Time commitment: Four hours 3. The Complete Python Course A mix of theory and practice, this course will give you a complete understanding of Python from the ground up. You’ll start off with the basics and work your way up to more advanced topics like building web apps with Django and visualizing decision trees. Free of “fluff,” you’ll find real-world examples, hands-on exercises and step-by-step solutions. Cost: $149 Time commitment: 12 hours Beginner Python certification Once you’ve got the basics of Python down, consider proving your new skills with PCEP – Certified Entry-Level Python Programmer, a certification for coding newbies. Get this certification and you’ll show employers that you know basic programming concepts (e.g., data types, functions, conditions and loops), as well as Python specifics, including the language syntax and runtime environment. It’s a great starting point if you want to launch a career in software development, but consider skipping this one if you’re already working in tech. Exam price: $59 Bonus tip for beginners Pick a project you’re passionate about and start working on it. Figure out the best way to implement it, find useful modules, read up on anything you’re not sure about and work from there. Intermediate Python courses Learning Python as your second or third language? Want to to level up your skills as a developer? Already have a math or computer science background? These courses build upon Python basics, introducing you to intermediate topics in machine learning and data science, and helping you write more readable, clean code. 4. Intermediate Python As the name suggests, this course teaches intermediate Python concepts and best practices, from regular expressions to type hinting to Python decorators. You’ll even build a command line diary app that stores journal entries in a SQLite database and gives you the ability to review, edit, delete and search through them (a great addition to your Python portfolio). Cost: $25 per month with a Treehouse subscription Time commitment: Nine hours 5. Analytics in Python In this course, you’ll learn how to use Python for gathering, cleaning and analyzing data. Taught by a professor at Columbia University, the course covers concepts like web scraping and crawling, text mining, data analysis, natural language processing and machine learning in Python. Cost: Free, but you can get a verified certificate of completion for $249 Time commitment: 8–10 hours per week (for 12 weeks) 6. Writing Efficient Python Code Clean, efficient Python code can help reduce runtime and save computational resources. Targeted at data scientists (and aspiring data scientists), this course will teach you how to use Python’s built-in data structures, functions and modules (e.g., pandas, range() function, NumPy arrays) to write more elegant code. Cost: $33.25 per month with a DataCamp subscription Time commitment: Four hours Intermediate Python certification Got a solid grasp on Python? Look into the PCAP – Certified Associate in Python Programming cert, which dives into object-oriented concepts and covers intermediate-level concepts like Python functions, modules and more advanced comparison operators, loops and file operations. This is a great option for programmers switching languages to Python, new CS grads or those who plan on pursuing more advanced Python certifications in the future. Exam price: $295 Bonus tip for intermediate learners Read Automate the Boring Stuff with Python by Al Sweigart, a well-loved book in the Python community. It focuses on using Python for real-world applications to help you build up a solid portfolio. Advanced Python courses Already developing full Python apps? A more advanced course might be what you’re looking for (and your current employer might be willing to pay for it). Before taking an advanced Python course, you should be familiar with the language’s syntax, as well as programming concepts like expressions, data structures, basic algorithms and lambda functions. 7. Advanced Python A course that goes beyond everyday Python, you’ll learn the advanced techniques used to implement sophisticated frameworks, like SQLAlchemy and Django. Other concepts on the syllabus: abstract base classes, byte-oriented programming, advanced flow control, instance creation, class decorators and much more. Cost: $29 per month with a Pluralsight subscription Time commitment: Four hours 8. Functional Programming in Python Most of us think of Python as an object-oriented language, but Python functions are also useful tools for data scientists and programmers (and require less code). In this course, you’ll learn how to approach functional programming in Python, including how to use immutable code to represent data, as well as how to use filter, map and reduce to avoid side effects. Cost: $19.99 per month with a Real Python subscription Time commitment: One hour 9. Design of Computer Programs What makes a good program? Intended for experienced Python programmers, this course gives you a process for thinking about the design of programs using advanced features of Python. You’ll learn how to go from the uncertain stage of not knowing what the problem really is to working your way to a solution (including when it’s okay to use brute force). Cost: Free Time commitment: Two months Advanced Python certifications There are two advanced-level Python certs available through the Python Institute: PCPP-32-1: Certified Professional in Python Programming 1 and PCPP-32-2: Certified Professional in Python Programming 2. The first focuses on math, science and engineering modules, and requires you to have expert-level OOP skills and GUI programming expertise. The second focuses on architecting and deploying entire enterprise-level Python apps. PCPP-32-1 is a great option for experienced Python programmers who want to prove their skills, while PCPP-32-2 is best if you want to move into a leadership role (e.g., team lead, engineering manager, DevOps). Get both PCPP certifications and you’ll automatically become a Certified Expert in Python Programming (CEPP), which shows employers that you’re prepared for any senior-level Python role. Exam price: $195 each Bonus tip for advanced Python programmers Sort Stack Overflow Python questions by most votes and go down the list. How many of these can you answer? Brush up on the rest. This technique is especially helpful because you can check your solution against others and see different ways to solve challenging problems. Take your career further with a Python course (and maybe a certification) Taking a Python course can help you advance your career by filling your portfolio with projects that attract recruiters and opening up opportunities that better match your career goals. But while courses are often a worthwhile investment, certifications aren’t for everyone. A Python certification is rarely (if ever) required for any tech job. However, some recruiters use them as screening tools to decide who to bring in for an interview. And when you’re new to a field, anything you can do to set yourself apart is worth considering. That said, it’s important to think carefully about your experience level, background and career goals to determine if you actually need a Python certification or if your code is proof enough. The post The best way to learn Python: 13 courses and certifications appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
  11. If sourcing tech talent in all the usual places is slow to give you the results you need, you’re not alone. Our recent tech hiring report found that one of the biggest struggles for 35% of tech hirers is the time and effort it takes to search for candidates. And because tech candidates don’t have to settle these days, run-of-the-mill cold outreach is more likely to turn them off than pique their interest. But these sourcing challenges can actually work in your favor—if you’re willing to try something new. Which is what brings us to Reddit. Even if you have close to zero knowledge of Reddit, chances are you’ve come across a Reddit thread or two running a Google search. This online message board draws in 430 million monthly users to join conversations on just about anything, including tech talk. No, Reddit isn’t really classified as a way to source tech candidates, but that’s part of what makes it so effective. Reach a fresh set of tech pros when you learn the ins and outs of this best kept secret. Keep reading as we dive into the best practices and tips for sourcing tech candidates on Reddit. Why Reddit? Reddit’s where people go to escape and explore—a place they’re more likely to express themselves freely versus only publicizing what they want recruiters and hiring managers to see. This means extra insights about their interests, experience and goals you won’t find on other sourcing channels like professional networking sites. And because you’re bound to find discussions on almost every topic under the sun, you’ll likely find the talent you’re looking for, whether that’s a soon-to-be computer science grad, seasoned data analyst or VP of engineering. Not only that, but it’s one of the cheapest ways to tap into a large, diverse talent pool. Hundreds of tech hirers tell us how they attract top talent: download the report now First steps to sourcing on Reddit You probably won’t be hopping onto Reddit as a first-time user one day and recruiting talent the next. But that doesn’t mean you won’t see positive results in the long run. All it takes is spending a little bit of time upfront to understand the Reddit culture and build trust within the community. Getting started The first step: Create an account. It’s free. Once you’re in, read up on best practices as well as FAQs and Reddiquette (a list of rules and values written by members outlining the dos and don’ts of interacting on the platform). This is an important part of sourcing on Reddit because users (known as Redditors) don’t go there to catch up on recruiter messages or spam—and they don’t expect to be greeted with it. If Redditors do suspect you of spam or self-promotion? There’s a good chance you’ll be quickly called out, or even banned. Tip: You’re representing your company and personal brand on Reddit, so keep it professional when choosing a username. Consider a combination of your first name and/or the company you’re recruiting for plus something like “Tech” or “Recruiter.” Building trust Because Redditors are known to be wary of strangers and spam, building up trust in the community is a must. Before switching into recruiting mode (e.g., posting jobs, cold outreach), watch and observe how users interact. Hone in on what topics get the most engagement. Any trending tech or job search conversations? After you spend a little time observing, start engaging with Redditors by commenting and sharing information. Doing this helps build up your karma. Karma is the scoreboard of Reddit. Every time someone upvotes (or “likes”) one of your posts or comments, you gain karma points. At the same time, each downvote you receive causes you to lose out on about one karma point. In all, the more karma you have, the more likely Redditors will see you as a trustworthy, credible source. Sourcing tech candidates on subreddits Reddit is broken up into subreddits, and each subreddit is dedicated to a specific topic. So when it comes to scouting out tech talent on Reddit, where do you go first? To reach a larger pool of candidates—both passive and actively looking—your best bet is to search for subreddits in these two categories: (1) subreddits about tech topics (e.g., r/coding, r/javascript, r/webdev), and (2) subreddits for posting open jobs (e.g., r/tech jobs, r/javascript_jobs). Something to note: Each subreddit has its own set of rules. Find these rules either pinned at the top of the main subreddit page or along the right-hand side. Search on subreddits about tech topics Say you’re looking for tech professionals with a few years of Java experience. You might head straight to r/java, where people chat about the language. You could also join r/programming and run a search for “Java” within that community to filter out all questions related to Java. Sticking with the Java example, here’s another option: Hop into r/learnjava, a community where people seek help learning the language. While you’re there, look at who’s answering the questions and find Redditors that provide thoughtful answers. This not only signals that they’re skilled in Java, but can also indicate their passion for tech and mentoring junior developers. Search on subreddits for posting open jobs Once you’re more comfortable navigating the Reddit landscape (and have built up a good amount of karma), start connecting with people on subreddits that allow you to post open jobs. For example, r/techjobs is a community and job board that helps “connect people who work in tech with each other, and with businesses who need them,” while r/devopsjobs is a subreddit specifically for filling DevOps roles. In both of these subreddits, tech sourcers and recruiters are free to engage with job seekers as well as post descriptions of their open roles. Keep in mind, staying active and present is an important part of connecting with tech professionals. In other words, don’t post an open role and forget about it. There’s a good chance users will either directly comment to your post or private message you, and ghosting them could cause you to lose out on a potential match. Tip: Along with joining subreddits about tech topics and job postings, you can also offer recruiter insight on subreddits related to career advice (interviewing, requirements, education, etc.) to widen your search. Try r/cscareerquestions or r/careerguidance. Learning more about a Redditor (and ways to reach out) Reddit profiles don’t include much personal information about a user (unlike GitHub, where just a glance can clue you into their coding skills and more). So as you browse Reddit, remember this: Most of the insight you’ll gather about a user and their skillset will be found within posts and comments. What can you learn about a user? First spot a potential candidate, then click on their username. This will pull up all of their posts and comments. Scroll through to review their engagement (you’ll also see the number of points each of their comments and posts have received). On the right-hand side of the page, you’ll see how much total karma they’ve built up since they first joined Reddit (AKA their “cake day”). Because a Reddit profile offers limited information (not even a first name or location), digging up facts about a potential candidate isn’t a straightforward process. But the good news is Reddit Investigator can do some of the heavy lifting for you. Just enter a Redditor’s username in the search bar to uncover a probable location as well as a number of activity stats (e.g., subreddit engagement, comments with the most upvotes, most active hours). Aside from connecting with potential candidates within post comments, there are a couple of other ways to get in touch with them, too. Click on their username (just as you would to view activity and karma) to find a “Chat” and “Send message” button. These features allow you to send a private message. But tread lightly to stay in good standing. While it might be fast and easy to send a generic note, crafting a thoughtful outreach message is less likely to come off spammy and more likely to drive a response. Send a message that makes a real connection by: Researching the candidate. What motivates them? What accomplishments make them stand out? Any skills they enjoy working with most? Personalizing the message. This shows that you see them as more than a number—that you genuinely care about helping them go further in their tech career. For example: “I loved reading about your iOS side project. A new mobile app is in the works at Company XYZ, and it looks like your experience might be what we need.” Writing like a human, not a robot. Be yourself and show a little personality. Keep sentences short and sweet. Reddit: your new tech sourcing hack The pros of sourcing on Reddit can outweigh any upfront cons of having to familiarize yourself with subreddit rules or Reddiquette. Even if you only tap into the Reddit community every now and again to supplement your sourcing strategies, it can still be a solid addition to your tech sourcing arsenal. And just maybe, you’ll find yourself clicking over to “the front page of the internet” more often than not once those Reddit connections turn into one great hire after another. The post Sourcing on Reddit to uncover hidden tech talent appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
  12. So, I was applying for various positions and received this not-so-personal reply from a company. Although the company has a focus on technology, I figured they could at least get this part of the rejection done correctly. If you're having a difficult time following it, just take a look for "we've decided to move forward with other candidates for the [Position Name] position" 🙂 I do understand how these databases may have hundreds of applicants but this should be a clue to most of you that your application may not even be seen by a human.
  13. There are a lot of options when it comes to tech companies in San Francisco. After all, the Bay Area is widely considered the most important city in the world for both startups and global tech companies, with Silicon Valley located on its southern end. The city’s mix of opportunity, high livability, beautiful surroundings and diverse culture makes it one of the best places to take your tech talents. To help you find your match, we’ve put together a list of 20 tech companies in San Francisco hiring in 2020, including why you might want to work there (with insights from real employees). From a self-driving rideshare service to a digital shopping mall (where you can buy a pair of shoes for $3) to the latest innovations in property tech, check out what’s going on in the San Francisco tech scene. Autodesk Millions of people use Autodesk’s suite of 3D software to imagine, design and model everything from electric cars to towering skyscrapers to ice cream sandwich filler machines. Its software is also behind dozens of Academy Award winning movies for Best Visual Effects and has been used in films like Avatar and TV shows like Game of Thrones. At Autodesk, you’ll be encouraged to take risks and think big to solve problems for people who make things (e.g., engineers, architects, animators). One Autodesk employee praises the company culture and opportunities for professional development, saying it’s “one of the friendliest and most laid back companies I’ve worked for,” adding that the “relaxed environment allows individuals to cultivate creativity” and there’s a “strong focus on employee training and success.” Open tech roles at Autodesk. Working at Autodesk: A “week of rest” at the end of every year Six-week paid sabbatical every four years Paid volunteer time off Box Box is a cloud-based content management platform that allows people to securely store, manage and share important files, photos and documents from anywhere. In fact, Box is how over 95,000 companies (including 70% of the Fortune 500) and 25 million users access and manage their critical information in the cloud. With core values like “blow our customers’ minds,” “make mom proud” and “10x it!,” employees at Box are challenged to leverage their unique experiences and perspectives to make an impact. Diversity is a top priority here, with 11 employee-led groups (ERGs), including Box Women’s Network, Black Excellence Network and LatinX. Plus, the company only includes “must-haves” in their job descriptions to make more inclusive hires (e.g., they’ve removed “4-year degree preferred”). Open tech roles at Box. Working at Box: 12 weeks of paid leave for all new parents (20 weeks for birth moms) Free lunch, dinner and on-the-go meals Unlimited PTO Cruise Cruise is building self-driving cars that are 100% electric. Its vehicles are already on the road in San Francisco, Michigan and Phoenix, navigating some of the most complex and unpredictable traffic scenarios humans face every day. The goal? Launch San Francisco’s first fully autonomous rideshare service. Tech teams at Cruise work in small groups of six to nine to empower engineers with more responsibility. Beyond high impact-per-engineer, you’ll be solving some of the toughest challenges (and see the real results of your work) across robotics, machine learning, speech processing, data modeling and more, whether you’re writing the code that steers self-driving cars, supporting petabytes of data or anything in between. Open tech roles at Cruise. Working at Cruise: Catered lunch and dinners (with a vegan-friendly snack bar) Hack Weeks and Tech Talks In-office massages Join Seen for free to get matched with companies like these Discord Over 250 million gamers use Discord—a free voice, text and video chat app—to talk to their friends (and make new ones). Its mission is to bring people together around playing games, whether you want to connect with fellow Sims fans or join a World of Warcraft guild. (There are even Discord servers for non-gaming topics, like wedding planning.) Based in San Francisco’s Potrero Hill, which is known for being one of the sunniest neighborhoods in the city, Discord is a positive, exciting (and nerdy) place where coworkers become friends, leadership is highly accessible and everyone’s ideas and input are appreciated. Its supportive, friendly culture is built on four values: autonomy, mastery, purpose and compassion. Open tech roles at Discord. Working at Discord: Fully subsidized commuter and parking benefit (up to $265/month) A desk fund to make your space yours Yoga in office every Thursday (plus a fitness allowance) DocuSign A company that’s replaced over 20 billion sheets of paper with an eco-friendly digital process, DocuSign helps more than 500,000 customers and hundreds of millions of users in over 180 countries sign, send and manage agreements electronically. Its flagship eSignature product is the world’s #1 way to sign contracts, offer letters, purchase orders and other agreements on any device, from almost anywhere in the world. Named #3 in Glassdoor’s 2020 Top 100 Best Places to Work (the company’s fourth consecutive year in the top 25), DocuSign employees are building never-been-done-before solutions in a culture of innovation, collaboration and transparency where creativity is encouraged. “The leadership [team] is completely open and transparent, and is big on communication,” says one employee. “They take employee surveys seriously and make tremendous efforts to address any issues raised.” The company also invests in people manager development to ensure that every employee can do the work of their lives at DocuSign. Open tech roles at DocuSign. Working at DocuSign: Six months of paid parental leave Learning and development training Wellness reimbursement Ellie Mae Ellie Mae is a fintech company powering the American Dream of homeownership for thousands of people every day. It currently processes 40% of US mortgage applications with tech solutions that help banks, credit unions and independent mortgage bankers originate loans quicker, lower costs and reduce time to close for homebuyers. Its goal? Automate everything possible in the residential mortgage industry. Ellie Mae’s family-oriented work culture means work/life balance is a priority. Its easy-going environment, combined with helpful coworkers and managers, gives you endless opportunities to learn and grow. One tech employee describes Ellie Mae’s culture as supportive and friendly: “No matter what role you are in, you will never hear ‘that is not my job’ from a fellow peer. Everyone is always kind, willing, and helpful.” Open tech roles at Ellie Mae. Working at Ellie Mae: Flexible work hours Paid volunteer opportunities Unlimited free ice cream Figure Eight Figure Eight combines the best of human and machine intelligence to help companies create value from their unstructured text, audio, image and video data. Its human-in-the-loop machine learning technology powers some of the world’s most innovative projects, from autonomous vehicles and medical imagery to intelligent chat bots, facial recognition, music recommendations and even search relevancy for online shoppers. Headquartered in San Francisco, Figure Eight, now part of Appen, serves Fortune 500 and fast-growing organizations across a wide variety of industries, including automotive, ecommerce, entertainment, agriculture, finance and beyond. On top of fun startup perks like a ping pong and snooker table, its company culture is defined by four core values: honesty, humility, grit and performance. Open tech roles at Figure Eight. Working at Figure Eight: Catered lunch three times a week Fully covered medical care Wellness benefits and generous vacation Fitbit Fitbit is an activity tracker, fitness coach, sleep lab, wallet and personal assistant that fits on your wrist. Its family of products (e.g., fitness app, smartwatches, trackers, smart scales) help you stay motivated and get a complete picture of your health, including daily steps, heart rate, calories burned, weight and sleep quality. Fitbit’s HQ is located in the heart of San Francisco, with three office buildings within walking distance of the Embarcadero. As a tech employee, your code will impact millions of people, whether you’re working on data storage infrastructure, the mobile app, the Fitbit SDK or anything in between. Combining the spirit of a nimble startup (complete with a kombucha keg and cold brew coffee) with the resources of a global corporation, Fitbit is a great place to grow your career, especially if values like “Own your success,” “Debate, commit, execute” and “Make things we are proud of” speak to you. Open tech roles at Fitbit. Working at Fitbit: Unlimited snacks Friday happy hours Onsite yoga, pilates and meditation classes Gametime Gametime sells last-minute tickets to popular sports, music and theater events, saving fans up to 60% off face value. The company tracks thousands of tickets and only shows you the best deals (along with real panoramic photos of your seat view) so you can get the seats you want, whenever you want. You can even grab tickets after an event starts (e.g., after the first pitch at a baseball game) for the best, yet lowest-priced tickets. With a tech career at Gametime, you’ll get a front-row seat to reimagining the event ticket experience. Not only that, but the company is ahead of the game when it comes to making sure employees are happy, with plenty of learning opportunities, flexible PTO, commuter benefits and team celebrations. Engineers are empowered to own the code they write in a culture that believes in unit testing, code reviews and pushing code all the way through to production. Open tech roles at Gametime. Working at Gametime: Catered lunches (Monday through Thursday) Monthly Gametime credits for any live event ($1,200/year) Dog-friendly office Gap Inc. Gap Inc. is a leading fashion retailer with seven brands (Gap, Banana Republic, Old Navy, Athleta, INTERMIX, Hill City, Janie and Jack) and over 3,500 stores worldwide. From mobile point-of-sale solutions to tech that lets customers scan catalog pages with their phone and buy online, Gap is a pioneer in retail tech. A tech career at Gap gives you the opportunity to work in small, agile teams to design, develop, test, deploy and support apps that make it into the hands of store associates and impact millions of shoppers worldwide. Another perk? Gap’s HQ in San Francisco is near several of Gap’s stores, so you can use your employee discount whenever you want. Open tech roles at Gap. Working at Gap: 50% off at Gap, Banana Republic and Old Navy, 30% off at Outlet and 25% off at Athleta Up to five “on the clock” hours each month to volunteer Tuition reimbursement Grammarly Whether you’re writing critical work emails, applying for a job or even filling out an online dating profile, it’s important to be able to express yourself the way you intend. Enter Grammarly, an AI-powered writing assistant used by 20M+ people around the world to improve their writing. The platform can find and correct mistakes, detect tone (e.g., formal, friendly, optimistic) and help you find the perfect words. With a tech stack that includes React, TypeScript, Java, AWS, Python, PyTorch, scikit-learn, Spark, Scala, SQL and more, Grammarly offers team members autonomy along with opportunities to tackle creative challenges and to ship features fast and often in a collaborative environment supported by EAGER values (ethical, adaptable, gritty, empathetic, remarkable). Open tech roles at Grammarly. Working at Grammarly: Catered lunches Monthly gym credit (plus onsite yoga) Fully paid premiums for health and dental plans Okta Okta is an identity and access management company that enables any organization to securely use any technology. With over 6,500 pre-built integrations to apps and infrastructure providers, Okta customers can easily and securely use the best technologies for their business. Over 7,400 companies, including 20th Century Fox, Slack and Twilio trust Okta to protect the identities of their workforces and customers, and to manage access to critical information with solutions like multi-factor authentication, single-sign-on, and more. At Okta, your tech skills won’t go stale. Dev teams at Okta are fast, innovative and flexible. You’ll get the chance to work on stimulating, new and complex projects while working with the latest technologies in a culture that’s inclusive, diverse, creative and energetic. Open tech roles at Okta. Working at Okta: Volunteer opportunities Catered lunch three times a week Regular hackathons SoFi SoFi is on a mission to help people achieve the financial freedom they need to meet their life goals, from getting out of high-interest debt and paying off student loans to owning a home, saving for retirement and more. It offers student loan refinancing, mortgages, personal loans (and even an app for trading stocks and buying crypto) to help you borrow, spend, save, invest and protect your money. SoFi’s goal of helping people get their money right also translates to its employees. The company contributes $200 per month to help you pay off your student loans and up to $5,250 per year for continuing education. At SoFi, you’ll be in the middle of it all, from implementing functionality to squashing bugs to maintaining the health of the codebase. With strong collaboration between product, design and engineering, you’ll be involved in the entire product lifecycle, from ideation to deployment. Open tech roles at SoFi. Working at SoFi: Free medical coverage Fully stocked kitchen (plus lunch stipend) Subsidized gym membership Splunk Recently ordered a pizza online? Played a video game like Assassin’s Creed? Used Shazam on a song you heard in a store? Odds are, you’ve interacted with a company that uses Splunk. In fact, 18,500+ customers use the platform to ask questions, make decisions and take action on data gathered from website clickstreams, apps, sensors, devices, social data and more to creatively solve problems. Splunk, the Data-to-Everything Platform, is even helping support one company’s mission to discover new treatments for 100 genetic diseases by 2025. Named one of San Francisco Bay Area’s “Best Places to Work” by the San Francisco Business Times for 12 years in a row, “Splunkers” are empowered to live by the company’s core values of innovation, disruption, passion, openness and fun. One employee says that Splunk “…is a great place to work with excellent leadership and an environment that is innovative,” adding that the company genuinely cares about work/life balance. Splunkers also praise the company’s energetic and fast-paced environment, opportunities for growth and friendly, supportive coworkers. Open tech roles at Splunk. Working at Splunk: A “Million Data Points” culture that fosters diversity and inclusion, including nine Employee Resource Groups to build communities for under-represented groups and allies Generous parental leave for mothers and fathers, fertility treatments and tissue freezing, adoption and surrogacy allowances and more Dog-friendly office Square What started as a little white credit card reader has transformed into a full point-of-sale system that helps sellers of all sizes and industries start, run and grow their business. It empowers your favorite mom-and-pop restaurant to set up a delivery service, your electrician to send you invoices, the independent coffee shop down the street to pay its employees and locally-owned stores to simplify their online and in-store selling. Individuals can also use Cash App to spend, send, store and invest money. One software engineer at Square says that it’s “…a fantastic place to work, with a fantastic combination of responsible business practices, empathetic leadership, and talented coworkers. I love working here.” Growth and development is important and the career ladder is well defined for engineers, including a formal road map for professional growth. Product ownership is also big at Square, with employees getting the chance to weigh in on decisions, bring new ideas to the table and innovate in fields like hardware sustainability and crypto. Open tech roles at Square. Working at Square: Lunch and breakfast Work-from-home opportunities 16 weeks paid parental leave for all new parents ThousandEyes ThousandEyes keeps the internet’s most popular services running, providing immediate visibility into what’s breaking, and where. The SaaS-based platform empowers companies to see how they’re performing from thousands of different vantage points (giving the company its name). Its customers? 20 of the 25 top SaaS companies, six of the seven top US banks and 65+ of the Fortune 500. Thousand Eyes’s HQ is located in the SoMa district, San Francisco’s tech epicenter. Engineers here work in small, cross-functional teams where everyone has a voice. You’ll get to work on cutting-edge tech that visualizes networks on a global scale (and supports 116 billion data points per day) while focusing on innovation, simplicity and elegance. Explore the tech stack that’s used in different roles within engineering. Open tech roles at ThousandEyes. Working at ThousandEyes: Catered lunches and a stocked kitchen Well-equipped game room Gym subsidy and commuter benefits Twitch Twitch is a service and global community of millions who come together to interact and create the next generation of live entertainment. Twitch began as a place where people watched content creators play video games while chatting with millions of other fans at the same time. While gaming still makes up the majority of content, the platform has expanded to include more diverse streams dedicated to sports, music, cooking, art and more. The goal? To help people around the world connect over shared hobbies and interests. At Twitch, employees co-build with the diverse, global community. Employees encompass the energy and passion of their community, striving to deliver the very best for Twitch’s content creators and viewers. When you’re building a fun product surrounded by fun people, fun is inevitable. Twitch’s San Francisco HQ is an ode to nerd culture, from the extensive arcade, to the Pac-Man ghosts directing hungry employees in the cafeteria. If you’re lucky, you can catch a glimpse of one of the themed conference rooms, like The Upside-Down or Forbidden Forest. Open tech roles at Twitch. Working at Twitch: In-house kitchen with breakfast, lunch and dinner served daily (and cookies, too) Health and wellness activities and programs Dog-friendly office Veeva Systems Veeva Systems builds enterprise cloud software to help pharmaceutical and biotech companies bring life-changing medicines, therapies, vaccines and products to market faster. From software that accelerates clinical trials to a curated database system of 100,000+ oncology experts to apps for animal health, Veeva impacts the health and well-being of millions of people (and animals) around the world. Veeva’s CEO is an engineer, which means the company knows (and prioritizes) what makes tech workers happy and successful, including impact, meaningful work and the autonomy to get things done. A senior software engineer at Veeva says: “Every day brings new, interesting problems, with a good mix of bugs and features. Whenever I have difficulty with a problem, I have a great set of reliable and communicative coworkers to discuss the problem with, which means I’m never fumbling around by myself.” Employees also rave about how approachable everyone is (including upper management) and the endless opportunities to innovate and speak up about new ideas. Open tech roles at Veeva Systems. Working at Veeva Systems: Onsite gym with free fitness classes offered daily “Veeva Break” (a full week off during the holiday season) Gourmet meals prepared by an in-house chef every day Wish $1 watches? Bluetooth headphones for $9? $5 for a graphic tee? Wish is a mobile shopping app that makes affordable products accessible to everyone, with prices 60-90% cheaper than they are in stores. Millions of people from 100+ countries buy nearly one billion products annually from this digital shopping mall of affordable goods. The relatively flat structure means employees are free to work on things that actually interest them. And the culture of freedom, flexibility and experimentation, along with the chance to push code daily to hundreds of millions of users (and see the direct results of your work) are some of the reasons why tech employees love working at Wish. Open tech roles at Wish. Working at Wish: Catered meals and fully stocked snacks Bi-weekly happy hours and quarterly team outings Dedicated personal learning and development budget Zillow Want to live close to a grocery store? Near a highly ranked school? In a quiet neighborhood? Zillow is a real estate and rental marketplace that streamlines the real estate transaction, helping you not only find the home you’re looking for, but schedule a tour and even get in touch with local real estate agents. Millions of people trust it to buy, rent or sell a home (it even ranks among the top 15 most-visited websites in the US). Known for Zestimate®, a home valuation algorithm that takes into account neighborhood details, property features, popularity on the site and listing price to come up with an estimated market value for a home, Zillow is on the forefront of real estate technology, revolutionizing home buying and selling—and even employing machine learning to power its search engines. At Zillow, engineers work in small teams in a culture of innovation, accountability and collaboration where everyone has a chance to make a big impact. Open tech roles at Zillow. Working at Zillow: 100% paid healthcare Six-week sabbatical after six years In-office yoga sessions Match to tech companies in San Francisco As the global home for startups for nearly half a century (with unicorns continuing to rise from the fog-covered hills) San Francisco has tons of career options when it comes to tech, spanning gaming technology and autonomous vehicles to retail tech and network intelligence. Ready to make your mark in San Francisco? Seen matches you to top tech companies like these. Complete your profile now (it only takes a few minutes) to find a new tech role that’ll take you further. The post 20 top tech companies hiring in San Francisco appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
  14. Today’s post comes courtesy of Pathrise, a career accelerator that works with students and professionals 1-on-1 so they can land their dream job in tech. Fellows in the Pathrise program are matched up with career and industry mentors, based on the roles they’re interested in. Pathrise currently works with software engineers, web developers, product designers, data scientists, and product managers. As you move through the interview process with companies, you might be surprised by just how many people interview you (often at the same time in a panel). We’ve worked with hundreds of people to successfully navigate their job search and find a great tech role. These days, the process usually looks like this: Phone screen with a recruiter Technical assessment Technical phone interview with 1-2 team members and/or hiring manager Onsite interview, which can last all day and includes technical, behavioral and cross-functional interviews What’s your “risk factor” as a candidate? A lot of the reasoning behind multiple interviews goes towards mitigating risk. Each person you speak to gives you a rating and that is what the stakeholders look at to make a decision on the candidate. If an interviewee gets average confidence or above, then it’s a successful interview. Mainly, they are trying to mitigate risk as much as possible. There is much less risk in turning someone down who would be a good match than hiring someone who is a bad match, which is why they take the ratings really seriously. If they have below average confidence in hiring you, you likely will not get the job, because it’s too risky. There are three types of interviews that you will likely come across: technical, behavioral, and cross-functional. The technical interviews are meant to measure your background and how you will handle the tools, languages, and type of work you will be doing. Prepare for these by practicing the types of questions you’ll be asked, like these 93 software engineering interview questions. Behavioral interviews assess how you’ll add to the company culture. Prepare for your behavioral interviews by researching the company and getting a good understanding of their mission and values. If you’re looking for inspiration, here are some example answers from FAANG hiring managers. The factors that matter in cross-functional interviews The last type of interviews are fairly new additions to the process: cross-functional. The goal of these sessions is to measure whether someone is a team player or not. Emotional intelligence and collaboration are often major factors. This is especially true at startups and smaller companies because there are many more opportunities for people to work together across disciplines. Therefore, software engineers will often meet with a product manager and designers will often meet with product and engineering team members, so that they can get a sense of how the teams interact with one another and if this candidate would be a good asset. Most of the time, they want to see if the candidate has the empathy that’s necessary to work on inter-disciplinary tasks and teams. Likely, they will ask questions about the candidate’s experience working on these types of cross-functional teams and how they would react in certain situations. Here are some examples of these types of questions: What would you do if a product manager made a request that you thought was impossible? How do you deal with design criticism from someone who is not a designer? Talk about a time when you had to prioritize work within a cross-functional project. When answering these questions, it’s important to stay positive, even if you are describing a difficult situation or a conflict. Never blame other team members or use negative words like lazy, stupid, annoying, or useless. Explain the situation briefly and move quickly onto how you worked well with other people to solve the issue and then highlight the result. These interviewers might also ask more general questions about how you work on a team, if you find yourself acting a leader or a follower, and how well you work autonomously. These types of questions are often behavioral in nature and also connect to how they perceive how you’ll add to the culture. Keep in mind that your responses should be succinct and specific. You should always err on the shorter side. Curb your answers by giving the interviewer the opportunity to ask for more information by saying, “I’m happy to go into more detail, if you would like.” If you follow these tips, you should be able to prepare for all of your interviews by researching the company, practicing your responses and understanding the process. When you feel ready, you’ll go into these sessions with confidence and your interviewers will see that. Good luck! The post What makes cross-functional interviews different? appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
  15. Ever applied for a job you thought you were perfect for, only to never hear back? The resume black hole is real. In fact, the average job opening attracts around 250 resumes, but only about 2% of applicants will be called in for an interview. And that’s if a human ever even sees your resume. To manage high volumes of applicants, many companies (including 98.2% of the Fortune 500) are using bots to screen out around 75% of candidates before a recruiter or hiring manager even sees their resume. How does it work? When you apply for an open role, an applicant tracking system (ATS) scans your resume for terms that match those used in the job listing and ranks yours against everyone else’s. So even if you’re qualified for the job (or perfect for it), there’s a good chance you might be rejected, especially if you don’t optimize your resume for “robot” eyes. How can you get your resume into the hands of a human? Show us your tech resume and we’ll tell you exactly what to improve, using guidelines to get your resume past an ATS so you stand out from the competition (and get noticed by more recruiters). Our free resume review includes: The skills and keywords you should be including. What technologies employers are really looking for so you can improve your searchability and rank high for the position you want. Resume formatting mistakes to avoid. Is your resume getting garbled in an ATS? How to format your resume to make sure bots can actually read it (sometimes the uglier, the better). Any other errors you (and your friends) might’ve missed. We’ll proofread your resume for typos, misspellings and grammatical errors. Additional resources. Other tools to help you craft an ATS-friendly tech resume that appeals to both the bots and human recruiters. Upload your resume and we’ll send personalized feedback straight to your inbox within 5-7 days. (For tech resumes only.) (Note: This is a limited time offer.) Want more? Become a Seen member to access our full lineup of career services The job search doesn’t stop at your resume. Seen members get access to our full range of career coaching services and tools, including: 1:1 advice from a tech career coach Exclusive AMAs and webinars Tech career resources (guides, market insights, tutorials) Exposure to top tech companies Join Seen for free. Once you’re in, we’ll give you the career coaching tools you need to land your next big opportunity (and connect you with roles that match your salary, role and location preferences). The post Make your tech resume stand out with a free resume review appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
  16. When you hire the right people, you build a team that’s more productive, energized and wants to stick around. But a candidate who looks good on paper and aces the interview might not line up with your company culture, while someone whose resume doesn’t match the job description 100% (or who can’t shake those interview jitters) could become your best-performing employee. So how do you hire the best candidate, not just the best resume writer or interviewer? And how do you keep them around for the long haul? We sat down with Rachel Stewart Johnson, PhD, a psychology specialist at Traitify for a webinar on how personality tests like the Big Five can solve some of the biggest tech hiring challenges: attracting, engaging and retaining top talent. Challenge #1: You’re not standing out to the right tech talent Are you boring people out of applying for your open roles? Traditional recruiting experiences tend to have the same look and feel. Virtually everyone uses an ATS, for instance, so the mechanics of applying to a position are the same from one company to another. Plus, if everyone is using similar language to describe what makes their role and company appealing, it dilutes your message. The good news? You don’t need a cool, quirky brand (or a bring-your-dog-to-work perk) to start attracting the right tech talent. How personality tests can solve it Personality tests are an interactive way to break up the job application monotony and make your candidate experience distinctive and memorable. It also gives candidates a takeaway—i.e., even if they aren’t hired, they get something in return (instead of their application getting lost in the job search black hole). This puts the human touch back into the process of applying for a job (which job seekers crave) and adds a fun, creative twist to the usual hiring routine. Not only that, but studies show that personality quizzes are irresistible (and even addicting)—whether someone wants to find out what their ideal work style is or what character from The Office they are. Beyond positively impacting candidate experience, personality tests give visibility into if a candidate is right for your company culture (without introducing personal bias). They can help determine if a candidate is a good match for the position, too. For instance, a candidate who enjoys moving fast might technically match the job description, but will they really be happy in a role that involves daily meetings and slow-moving processes? According to Stewart Johnson, high job satisfaction begins at the recruitment level: “Someone who wants the stimulation of a more fast-paced environment and isn’t in it will over time start to get fatigued and less engaged,” she says, “And you can imagine how that’s the kind of person who is then going to get the wandering eyes and be looking for a different opportunity elsewhere.” Challenge #2: You depend too much on resumes It’s a “keyword world” when it comes to resumes. The problem is, this kind of system can be easily gamed (i.e., people with keyword awareness often score higher than those whose skills and experience are a closer match for the role). There are several other challenges recruiters face when screening tech resumes: Resumes frequently contain exaggerations, omissions or half-truths. In fact, one in three people admit to telling a white lie on their resume and 75% of hiring managers have detected resume inaccuracies. Resumes are quick snapshots of the past. They don’t tell you anything about the person’s personality and may or may not have great predictive power into job performance. There are lots of things resumes don’t reveal. What’s missing? A candidate’s soft skills (e.g., ambition, ownership, empathy), goals, work style and motivators. Resumes are a good starting point, but they should be only one piece of the puzzle when determining whether a candidate moves forward or not in the hiring process. (One company even saw favorable results by hiring without looking at a single resume, instead asking tech candidates to write about something they’ve built.) How personality tests can solve it Qualifications, skills and experience are important, but it’s also important to contextualize resumes with a more nuanced understanding of the whole person. Maybe they have a track record of meeting tight deadlines, for instance, but have trouble managing their anger in stressful situations. A personality test can reveal concerns like these. They can also help you get more out of interviews. We tend to like people who are like us (e.g., fans of the same sports teams), but emotional reactions to interviews aren’t productive. Instead, Stewart Johnson recommends leveraging a candidate’s personality data to guide the discussion. For example, if someone rates low on adaptability, but your company is a fast-paced startup, take that as a cue to dive deeper into how they’ll perform in this kind of environment. This will boost interview productivity and even standardize interviews across candidates to help eliminate unconscious bias. Finally, personality data can be used to generate “match scores” that can improve your time to hire metric. When one of Stewart Johnson’s clients was hiring for a managerial role, she used benchmarks based on the Big Five personality dimensions to determine which candidates were likely to succeed in the role. On average, candidates who were put into the “preferred” category based on their test results were hired in 30 days. Those who were put into the “potential risk” category had a hiring time nearly twice as long. Watch the full webinar for more tips on how to go beyond the resume Challenge #3: You’re losing employees because they have no sense of meaning or impact Today’s tech talent wants to make a positive impact, especially Gen-Z. If your employees feel like they’re making a difference, they’re more likely to put in extra effort and stay longer than disengaged employees. In short, they’re not just satisfied with their job, they’re energized by it. Companies have tapped into the “search for meaning” at the recruitment level, but how can you extend this into on-the-job practice? Post-hire discussions around personality show employees that you’re not just talking the talk, but walking the walk, according to Stewart Johnson. How personality tests can solve it Personality tests can help you retain talent by: Showing you care about developing the whole person. So employees can maximize their strengths, address their challenges and understand the settings they work best in, as well as come up with a vision for their progress within the company. Improving communication and understanding. By using personality insights, you can structure better-performing teams and assign people to tasks based on their strengths and weaknesses. Employees feel like they’re having a real impact because teams are productive and harmonious. Helping you identify and support different work styles. People in the tech space, for instance, might work best during non-traditional business hours. If you understand that early on through personality tests, you can maximize their productivity and keep burnout at bay. Get to know tech candidates on a deeper level (both pre- and post-hire) While personality tests shouldn’t make or break your hiring decisions, they can guide you to your next hire faster, even surfacing candidates you might have overlooked. Plus, they can improve your candidate experience and retention rates along the way. So even though someone might lack the experience or skills you hoped they’d have (or the right keywords on their resume), personality tests can help ensure you’re not overlooking the best candidates for your open roles. The post How personality tests solve 3 TA challenges for tech jobs appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
  17. From rapidly automating deployment to its self-healing capabilities, Kubernetes (or K8s) has revolutionized how tech teams deploy and manage containerized apps at scale, which is pretty remarkable considering it was released into the wild just five years ago. With the support of a number of big-name companies, including Microsoft, RedHat and IBM (and Docker actively contributing to the project from the start), this trending open-source container management tool has surged in popularity to become the market leader. According to a recent Cloud Native Computing Foundation survey, Kubernetes is a top choice (by far) in container management, with 83% of respondents using it. Since it’s one of the top 10 fastest-rising tech skills on Indeed and a standard for container orchestration, we’re bringing you a deeper look at employer demand and talent interest based on job postings from the job search site—along with what stepping into a Kubernetes career might look like. Recent employer and candidate trends affecting Kubernetes careers Good news for anyone keen on Kubernetes: Year-over-year demand for this container tool has increased dramatically since 2015. Indeed data shows that in the four-year period between October 2015 and October 2019, the share of Kubernetes jobs per million grew by 2,141.03% while the share of Kubernetes job searches increased 2,125.66%. Since it was only released in 2015, that exponential growth isn’t surprising, though it’s notable that we see a balance between both employer and candidate interest in Kubernetes. Data from the most recent year, however, not only tells us that overall interest has cooled off a bit, but more so on the talent side. From October 2018 to October 2019, the share of Kubernetes jobs per million rose 53.33%, but the share of Kubernetes job searches saw a mere .85% gain. Top 5 Kubernetes careers in tech All in all, it’s a good time to flex your Kubernetes skills with employer demand growing faster than candidate interest. According to Indeed job postings, here are the five tech roles that call for Kubernetes talent most. You may not be surprised to see roles linked to DevOps and cloud on this list as they share a symbiotic relationship. Each on its own is a helping hand in reaching business goals, but when implemented together, companies can achieve far greater results to increase competitiveness in this digital age. And being provider-agnostic, Kubernetes is the de facto standard platform when adopting DevOps in any cloud-native environment. Kelsey Hightower, coauthor of Kubernetes Up & Running, says: “Kubernetes does the things that the very best system administrator would do: automation, failover, centralized logging, monitoring. It takes what we’ve learned in the DevOps community and makes it the default, out of the box.” For dev teams, when Kubernetes steps in to manage the dev and deployment lifecycle, from automating feature rollouts with zero downtime to performing node and container health checks (even self-heal), they can focus more on features and functions and less on tedious tasks. And because Kubernetes is largely used with Docker software packages, it allows software engineers and developers to push products to production even faster and more reliably than when using Docker alone. Join Seen for free to get matched with a new Kubernetes role Companies hiring the most for Kubernetes roles With how fast Kubernetes has gained traction and support, we looked at job postings on Indeed to find out what companies are hiring for this skill. IBM IBM offers one of the first fully managed Kubernetes offerings, IBM Cloud Kubernetes Service, renamed in 2018 from IBM Cloud Container Service, which has deployed over 16,000 production clusters that support billions of transactions each day. On top of IBM’s acquisition of Red Hat, which will bring a next-gen hybrid multi-cloud platform based on open-source tech, IBM is ramping up its Kubernetes compatibility with the announcement of two new open-source projects, Kui and Iter8, to facilitate Kubernetes development. Open tech roles at IBM. VMware By providing the products and services needed to run apps on any cloud, VMware empowers organizations across industries, from banking to retail to manufacturing, to become digital businesses. And it recently baked Kubernetes into its server virtualization platform, vSphere. At its 2019 annual conference, VMware announced Project Pacific, an initiative to re-architect vSphere. Now that vSphere is a Kubernetes native platform, the 500,000 enterprises currently running on it will no longer need separate stacks for cloud native or virtualized apps. Another big move for VMware? It recently acquired Pivotal, a cloud application platform provider to “combine Pivotal’s development platform, tools and services with VMware’s infrastructure capabilities to deliver a comprehensive Kubernetes portfolio,” according to VMware CEO, Pat Gelsinger. Open tech roles at VMware. Microsoft Offering security, reliability and flexibility, the Microsoft Azure cloud computing platform drives business value for companies across the globe. And its Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) makes managing containerized apps easier than ever. A few features of AKS: serverless container capability (called virtual nodes), Kubernetes-based Event-driven Autoscaling (or KEDA, which was developed in partnership with Red Hat to provide event-driven capabilities for any Kubernetes workload) and Azure Dev Spaces, a way for teams to test and develop a complete microservices app in AKS minus the need to replicate or mock dependencies. Open tech roles at Microsoft. Verizon With over 80 applications on cloud native platforms like Kubernetes, Verizon sees container technology as key to its public cloud migration plans. At KubeCon + CloudNativeCon 2018, Nanda Kumar, a systems engineer at Verizon, mentioned that many of those apps are stateless, but the company was expanding into more robust stateful apps. Kumar also pointed out that Verizon had been testing running containers and Kubernetes in both bare metal and virtual machine environments. Open tech roles at Verizon. Cisco Released in December 2018, The Cisco Hybrid Solution for Kubernetes on AWS allows tech teams to develop and deploy apps across public and private clouds anywhere they want. With this solution, not only are developers able to fast forward innovation and reduce time-to-market, but IT teams can cut costs and enjoy a simplified approach to managing on-premises Kubernetes infrastructure. “Now, developers can use existing investments to build new cloud-scale applications,” said Kip Compton, senior vice president, Cloud Platform and Solutions at Cisco. “This makes it easier to deploy and manage hybrid applications, no matter where they run [and] allows customers to get the best out of both cloud and their on-premises environments with a single solution.” Open tech roles at Cisco. Ready for a career in Kubernetes? There’s no question as to if Kubernetes has shaken up the tech industry: it has. And it’s ecosystem continues to grow with new releases, updates, partnerships and supporters (like when Docker built in native support for Kuburnetes). Because this container management tool helps companies of all sizes maintain the health and responsiveness of apps, almost any company in any industry can realize its benefits—Pinterest, Shopify and Reddit already have. The more momentum it gains, the more opportunity you’ll have to step into a Kubernetes role that suits you and your career goals. The post Kubernetes in 2020 (and how it’s shaking up tech careers) appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
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  19. Does the five-day, 40-hour workweek still make sense? According to a survey from Robert Half, 66% of workers say no, preferring a compressed workweek. A compressed workweek is an alternative schedule that squeezes your standard workload into fewer days, resulting in longer weekends. And though there’s more than one way to compress your workload, the most common is by working four 10-hour days (rather than five 8-hour days). The biggest perk to a compressed workweek is arguably having that extra day for yourself, but other benefits include saving time and money on your commute or childcare, schedule flexibility and greater work/life balance. The catch? Finding an employer that offers this benefit—only 17% do. Even still, an increasing number of companies are testing (and adopting) compressed schedules. Microsoft, for instance, closed its offices for 2,300 employees in Japan every Friday for five weeks and saw productivity jump 40%. Perpetual Guardian, a New Zealand firm, made the switch to a four-day work week permanent after a trial resulted in lower stress levels and higher performance and engagement. Longing for longer weekends and fewer hours commuting? Find extra flex in your schedule at one of these 11 companies offering compressed workweeks. Basecamp Over 10,000 companies use Basecamp’s project management tool to organize projects all in one place. Unlike email chains and one-off sticky notes, Basecamp’s features like message boards, file sharing and automatic check-ins all but eliminate the fuss of keeping everyone in the loop, assigning tasks and tracking progress to move projects forward. What’s a compressed workweek at Basecamp? Example schedule: 8-hour workday, 4 days a week (32-hour workweek), May through August Four months out of the year, from May 1st to August 31st, employees stick to summer hours: 32-hour, four-day workweeks. The way Basecamp CEO Jason Fried sees it, “You can get plenty of stuff done in 32 and 40 hours if you cut out all the stuff that’s taking up your time.” During the months they’re not working compressed work schedules, the team regularly sticks to 40-hour workweeks. Dell With next-gen solutions, like Dell Technologies Cloud, AI, edge computing and enhanced data analytics, working at Dell means you’ll have every chance to get your hands on advanced platforms, tech and tools to make a real impact for others. What’s a compressed workweek at Dell? Example schedule: 10-hour workday, 4 days a week (40-hour workweek) Through its work flexibility program, Connected Workplace, eligible Dell employees can choose the work style that suits them best, from being fully remote to job-sharing (two part-time employees doing the work of one full-time employee) to compressed schedules. Opting for a compressed workweek gives team members the ability to fit work into less than five days, or “do a ten-day span and have time off on a recurring basis to attend to personal matters.” Duke University A top university and hospital, Duke University has been recognized as a best place to work by Forbes Magazine, Computerworld, The Scientist and others. (And of its top five undergraduate majors for the Class of 2023, computer science ranks number one.) So whether you’re one to turn data into actionable insights or build customized web-based software solutions, join Duke and you could be shaping the lives of students and researchers alike. What’s a compressed workweek at Duke University? Example schedule: 10-hour workday, 4 days a week (40-hour workweek) OR eight 9-hour days, one 8-hour day and one day off in a 2-week period (9/80 work schedule) Employees are generally able to compress their work in less than five days, if preferred. A couple of ways employees schedule an abbreviated workweek includes working four 10-hour days, or compressing two weeks of work into nine or nine and a half days. Join Seen for free to get matched with a company (and schedule) that works for you KPMG KPMG is an audit, tax and advisory firm that helps companies improve business performance and maintain compliance. And though KPMG has the backing of a leading global firm, you’ll find the culture as agile as a tech startup while you dig into designing solutions like AI-enabled managed services, implementing data science algorithms or pinpointing anomalies tucked away in large data sets. What’s a compressed workweek at KPMG? Example schedule: 10-hour workday, 4 days a week (40-hour workweek) From telecommuting to compressed workweeks, alternative schedules aren’t standard across the organization, but team members can work out an arrangement with their managers. “[Employee] satisfaction goes way up when they have control over their time,” says Barbara Wankoff, KPMG’s Director of Workplace Solutions. “And it increases employee morale and productivity and retention.” Northrop Grumman Northrop Grumman is at the forefront of global security and brings us some of the world’s most advanced products, from naval systems to the B-2 Spirit stealth bomber to NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope. Become part of the Northrop Grumman team for entirely new experiences and the chance to solve challenging problems in space, aeronautics, defense and cyberspace. What’s a compressed workweek at Northrop Grumman? Example schedule: Eight 9-hour days, one 8-hour day and one day off in a 2-week period (9/80 work schedule) Employees can design their schedule with options including telecommuting and 9/80 days (eight nine-hour days, one eight-hour day and one day off in a two-week period). “These flexible work arrangements give our employees the freedom to integrate their personal and professional passions, increase productivity and help us retain and recruit top talent,” Northrop Grumman tells Seen. “This is just one of many benefits we offer to ensure our employees know we value them.” Reusser Design Whether a client needs an SEO strategy reboot, website facelift or brand new app, Reusser Design is ready and waiting to meet those digital goals. If you thrive in a space where you can unleash your inner creative and juggle projects with moving deadlines, Reusser Design might be right up your alley. What’s a compressed workweek at Reusser Design? Example schedule: 10-hour workday, 4 days a week (40-hour workweek) Reusser Design gives employees a choice between working a four- or five-day work schedule. (At the moment, 75% of its employees choose a four-day week.) One way the team gets the most out of the shortened week is by setting aside two-hour blocks of time—no interruptions allowed. Ryan Ryan is a leading global tax services firm with over 14,000 clients across 50 countries (and named a great place to work time and time again). Working at Ryan, you’ll focus on developing enterprise apps, designing web-based software or troubleshooting Azure environments. What’s a compressed workweek at Ryan? Example schedule: 10-hour workday, 4 days a week (40-hour workweek) The Ryan team enjoys a culture that focuses on results (not hours) and have been enjoying the flexibility of four-day workweeks since 2008. As a result, Ryan saw employee turnover rate fall from 30% to 11% and watched as revenue and profit nearly doubled. SteelHouse On the cutting edge of ad tech, SteelHouse provides brands of all sizes advertising software to build stronger marketing connections. If you’re passionate about building intelligent, responsive products that make a real impact for the people they reach, you’ll find yourself right at home, whether developing UI components or optimizing performance for any of its creative products. What’s a compressed workweek at SteelHouse? Example schedule: One Friday off every month that doesn’t have a company holiday already SteelHouse observes one three-day weekend every month that doesn’t have a company holiday in it already. On these days (called SteelHouse Days), the entire company closes its doors. “Everyone loves a long holiday weekend because it’s refreshing and a needed break,” CEO Mark Douglas shares with Seen. “So we created that experience every month and it’s been our number one most loved perk.” “We’ve found that giving an extra three-day weekend ensures everyone on the team is rejuvenated and ready to give their all—both to their fellow teammates and our clients,” adds Anna McMurphy, VP, Head of People, Culture and Entertainment. “When you value your team as human beings it’s truly incredible how they reciprocate and put in the extra effort for the company.” PwC PwC is an assurance, tax and consulting services provider that uses modern tech to drive business change for its clients (like how it helped Chipotle launch a new loyalty program that led to a 99% increase in digital sales). Join the PwC team and be on the front lines of helping companies implement the right strategies needed to scale. What’s a compressed workweek at PwC? Example schedule: 10-hour workday, 4 days a week (40-hour workweek) Not all employees are required to adopt abbreviated schedules, but they are encouraged to follow a work schedule that fits their individual needs. According to Anne Donovan, US People Experience Leader at PwC, “For us, flexibility is not about working less, but it is about encouraging people to work differently,” adding that “when done right, flexibility results in a happier, healthier, and more productive workforce.” Ultimate Software Ultimate Software has made a name for itself as a leading provider of people management technology in the cloud (with customers like Subway and Yamaha as proof), and ranks #1 on Fortune’s Best Places to Work in Technology for 2019. Be part of the team to design innovative enterprise apps, solve challenging problems with tech like Python and Docker, and take part in a collaborative workplace with room for career development. What’s a compressed workweek at Ultimate Software? Example schedule: 10-hour workday, 4 days a week (40-hour workweek) The company makes a real effort to put its people first—and workplace flexibility is a key part of this. While over 40% of its team telecommutes, about a quarter take advantage of flexible schedules and compressed workweeks to make their schedules their own. Wildbit A small but mighty software company, Wildbit’s collection of web products (Beanstalk, Postmark and Conveyor) helps companies streamline operations and build loyal customers. On the team, further hone your tech chops as you play a role in its growing success using tech like C#, AWS and MySQL. What’s a compressed workweek at Wildbit? Example schedule: 8-hour workday, 4 days a week (32-hour workweek) What started as a trial run turned into the norm (they first experimented with it in 2017). Today, Wildbit is a remote-first team that works 32-hour, four-day workweeks. Natalie Nagele, Co-founder and CEO of Wildbit, shares with Seen her take on the success they’ve seen so far: “After years obsessing over productivity for our team, we realized that results are not quantified by the hours we spend in front of a computer. The brain is like a muscle. You need to work it and then give it time to rest to recover. It turns out, that rest is where we get our best inspiration and ideas. It’s when we are taking a walk or gardening, not when we are sitting at a desk. The results have been obvious enough to convince us to continue 32-hour workweeks for the last two years. We’re more productive, we make better informed decisions, and overall energy is higher when we come to work on Monday.” Find a compressed workweek that works for you Scrunching 40 hours into four days or scaling back weekly hours to 32 might be what comes to mind first when you think of compressed workweeks. But there are other ways companies offer employees abbreviated schedules, too. This might be shorter work weeks a few months out of the year or a 9/80 work schedule. Keep this in mind when you’re looking for a new opportunity that offers extra flex. And don’t forget, if flexible scheduling isn’t a company-wide option, that doesn’t mean you can’t negotiate an alternative schedule to break away from the usual 9-5. The post Compress your workweek at these 11 flexible companies appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
  20. Though it’s an office favorite for instant-messaging coworkers with thoughts only a Baby Yoda GIF can convey, celebrating big wins with dancing blob emojis and taking a quick break in your company’s #random or #cats channel, what does Slack have to do with tech recruiting? Slack doesn’t just put more laughter in your workday or prevent your inbox from getting clogged. It’s also a place where you can network, share and get advice from others in your field and even source top tech talent—without ever leaving your desk. How? Beyond internal comms among employees, the platform also has topic- and interest-specific digital communities that are open to the public (via invite) where members share knowledge and insights, and can DM each other directly. So whether you’re looking to talk shop with other recruiters, source tech pros for those hard-to-fill roles or streamline your hiring process, we’ve curated 30+ of the best Slack communities for tech recruiters to join (or create)—and why you should. Beyond chat: Why recruiters should join a Slack community Your job as a recruiter isn’t just to post job openings and wait for who comes along. It’s to get involved in the tech recruiting community and build strong relationships that could lead to your next hire. What better way to start making those connections than by joining a Slack community? If you don’t already use Slack as a tech recruiter, there are lots of good reasons why you should: Get real-time advice from experts in the HR world. Ask questions, request feedback or bounce around ideas with people who’ve been there, done that. Meet new friends and mentors. Network with like-minded hirers who have the same challenges and can share their solutions. Discover and share useful resources. Make recommendations, share your experiences and discuss industry news and tips. Find the tech talent you’re looking for. Post job listings, share candidates with other recruiters and connect with developers, designers and other tech pros where they hang out. Streamline your hiring process. Collaborate on writing job descriptions, arranging interviews (and trading interview notes) and onboarding new employees. More cat GIFs. Table of contents Slack communities for recruiter discussions Slack communities for sourcing tech talent Bonus: Slack for streamlining your hiring process 600+ tech hirers tell us how they attract top talent: download the report now The best Slack communities for recruiter discussions To get you started, we’ve rounded up some of the best Slack communities where you can meet others passionate about recruitment, learn about new tools your peers use and find the inspiration you need to make better hires. 1. #DBR Short for Dragons, Beers and Recruiters, #DBR is a community for in-house recruiters to share tips, experiences (both good and bad), candidates and insights. The community also gets together in real life with monthly drinks and learning events in Shoreditch, London. Answer a few questions to get access to the community. 2. Hacking HR A global community of HR change-makers, Hacking HR is where you can chat with people who are passionate about the intersection of the future of work, technology, people and organizations. Its primary channels are #diversityandinclusion, #hrtech, #peopleanalytics and #resources. Get instant access to the community. 3. HRtoHR No need to attend an expensive recruiting conference in a faraway city. HRtoHR is where HR professionals learn from each other in real time by chatting about best practices, new tools, everyday challenges and more. Get instant access to the community. 4. #People Connect with 5,000+ HR professionals, managers and people interested in organizational psychology, jump in on Q&As and AMAs, and solicit feedback and advice. Popular channels include #culture-chat, #employee-experience, #problem-situations and #interviewing. Answer a few questions to get access to the community. 5. People Geeks With over 8,500 members, People Geeks is a place to talk about workplace culture, learn about the latest in people analytics and share candidates, open roles, articles and advice. You’ll also find location-based channels for cities across the world so you can connect with those in your local area. Get instant access to the community. 6. PeoplePeople Join this community to meet talent industry experts from around the world, share ideas about the changing recruiting landscape and take part in AMAs with recruiting influencers. Channel topics run from #culture-tactics to #interestingarticles to #networking (which automatically matches you with someone else in the channel each month). Get instant access to the community. Source: PeoplePeople7. Recruiting Innovators A dedicated space where over 1,000 sourcers, recruiters and hiring leaders discuss HR trends, technology and the latest recruiting innovations. Topics of conversation range from career advice (e.g., switching from corporate to agency recruiting) to recommendations for hiring tools (e.g., psychometric test platforms, ATS). Get instant access to the community. 8. techrecruiter A smaller community of just over 250 members, techrecruiter’s channels touch on employer branding, candidate experience, recruitment marketing, sourcing techniques and more—but for tech hiring specifically. Get instant access to the community. You can use Slack communities for sourcing tech talent, too Unlike noisy social platforms, Slack is pretty quiet when it comes to recruiter activity. That means your outreach will likely get more engagement than it does on more common sourcing channels. And since there are Slack communities for nearly every niche, language and framework in tech (with thousands of active members you can message directly), there’s no shortage of talent to tap into. Use Slofile—a database of public Slack groups—to search for a Slack community centered around a role or skill. Not only will you learn more about these roles and skills, but you’ll also get to see how members talk about job hunting so you know how to approach potential candidates, as well as collect valuable insights for more personalized outreach. If you’re looking for PHP or JavaScript developers, for example, you could join a community like WeLearnJS or PHP Chat. Or since WordPress is mainly based on PHP and JavaScript, you could also join WP Developers’ Club or WordPress + Slack. Here are a few Slack communities you might want to join depending on the talent you’re looking for: Bot Developer Hangout clojurians Elm Erlang FEDs on Slack (front-end development) GraphQL Microsoft Developer Chat (.NET, SQL Server, Azure) Postgres Product School PySlackers Ruby developers You could also join a tech-focused Slack community based on the location where you’re hiring (nearly every major city has one): #techlondon Chicago Tech Cleveland Tech DCTech Denver Devs Irish Tech Community NashDev NYCTech phillydev Vancouver Developers Want more places to find tech talent? Check out our list of the best Slack communities for tech pros for 22 more groups to join based on the role you’re recruiting for (e.g., mobile developer, UX designer, product manager, QA engineer). Or, browse through the tech category on Slofile: https://slofile.com/category/Tech. Bonus: Create your own Slack channel to streamline the hiring process Another way to take advantage of Slack as a recruiter is to create your own internal Slack channel to keep track of the hiring process. While it’s not quite the same concept as a Slack community, creating your own Slack channel can make the tech hiring process faster and more efficient. Start a private channel for each role you need to fill (#hiring-[job title]) and invite everyone on your team who needs to be involved in the process. Pin the job listing at the top and include a plan for how you’ll go about filling the role. This might include setting deadlines, adding interview notes and feedback, sharing promising candidates and storing HR documents and candidate resumes. Source: Recruitee.comOther ideas include encouraging employee referrals by creating a channel where you announce new job openings to a company-wide audience or creating an #onboarding channel to make sure new hires don’t feel lost or confused in their first days and weeks (and to boost retention). Slack: An overlooked recruiting hack There’s no question: Slack dominates the workplace. As a recruiter, you’re probably already using it to chat to your team (and react to messages using your favorite memes)—but you can use it for much more than that. Join a few Slack communities that pique your interest to network with (and learn from) other recruiters. What roles are you hiring for? Get involved in a group you think your ideal candidate might be part of—whether it’s based on role title, skills or location—and start to form connections. And finally, cut down the amount of time it takes you to hire by using Slack channels to recruit smarter. The post 30+ of the best Slack communities for tech recruiters appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
  21. Cloud isn’t just a tool anymore, but a way of life. As of 2019, the worldwide public cloud services market sits at $214.3B and Gartner predicts it’ll hit $331.2B by 2022. If so, growth of the cloud services industry will be about three times that of overall IT services. These days, migrating to the cloud is a priority for companies of all sizes (an estimated 83% of enterprises will be in the cloud by 2020 with 41% running on public cloud platforms). And with leading public cloud providers battling to be number one, acquisitions and partnerships are emerging, like IBM’s $34 billion acquisition of RedHat as well as Microsoft Corporation’s and AT&T’s recent announcement that AT&T’s 5G network will run on Azure. But even with a promising outlook, the cloud computing market isn’t immune to fluctuations. We used Indeed.com data to find out how the overall market is affecting the job market to answer questions like: Are candidates searching for clouding computing jobs more or less in recent years? Are there even enough jobs to go around? (Rest assured, there are.) Cloud computing trends: a snapshot of candidate and employer activity Even with a dip in recent job seeker activity, the cloud computing job market looks bright. According to Indeed.com, in the four-year time period between October 2015 and October 2019, the share of cloud computing jobs per million increased by 54.92%. During that same time, the share of searches per million for cloud computing jobs grew by 20.71%. Looking more recently, we see less growth on both sides of the job market. From October 2018 to October 2019, the share of cloud computing job postings per million on Indeed rose by 12.17%, while the share of searches per million for these jobs decreased by 2.61%. Less job seeker and employer interest is no indication of a major slowdown but may suggest a natural plateau after years of aggressive growth. Amazon Web Service, Inc., for instance, is a prime example of somewhat slower, yet stable gains. AWS increased 35% in Q3 2019, despite that quarter seeing the lowest growth in the last five years. Join Seen for free to get matched with a cloud computing role that’ll put you on cloud nine How leading cloud computing providers are faring AWS, Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud Platform drive the cloud computing industry, and each cloud provider has seen impressive growth over the last several years. But which one leads the way in terms of job postings and searches? In the four-year stretch from October 2015 to October 2019, the percentage change in job seeker searches increased for all three: AWS by 157.77%, Azure by 130.41% and Google Cloud by 908.75%. The most recent year, however, tells a slightly different story. That’s when searches for both Google Cloud and AWS dropped (by 9.22% and 5.5% respectively) while job seeker interest for Azure rose by 15.39%. The percentage change in job postings is similar to that of job searches. From October 2015 to October 2019, all three providers saw growth. The share of job postings in that time period increased for AWS by 232.06% and Azure by 302.47%, while Google Cloud saw the biggest jump at 1,337.05%. Between 2018 and 2019, the number of job postings for AWS climbed 21.07%, Azure by 30.59% and Google Cloud by 40.87%. Want to know where cloud computing roles pay the most? Check out our list of the 10 top cities for high cloud engineer salaries. Learn these in-demand tech skills, give your cloud career wings With less job seeker interest than job postings, there’s a chance you have a slight competitive edge as a tech candidate. But you still need to continually develop the right skills to stand out from the rest and seal the deal at your next cloud interview. When looking at job titles containing “cloud” on Indeed, AWS tops the list of tech skills in demand for those roles, followed by Java, Python, Azure and SQL. But how important is it to know all of these skills if you specialize in a particular cloud computing platform—i.e., do you need to know Azure if your primary focus is Google Cloud Platform? For the most part, yes. Employers hiring specifically for AWS, Azure or Google Cloud roles all want tech talent skilled in AWS, Python, Azure and Java. This means that if you want your cloud engineering career to take off, you should be familiar with each. But while four out of the top five in-demand skills are the same for each platform, a different skill rounds out each list. Indeed data tells us that AWS job postings want candidates skilled in Linux, Azure jobs are looking for SQL talent and Google Cloud needs Google Cloud Platform expertise. Where will your cloud computing career take you? As it turns out, having your head the clouds isn’t such a bad thing. The cloud computing industry has proven it’s more than a fleeting trend as companies make the shift from hardware-heavy systems to remote cloud servers—and our data proves it (along with the continued revenue growth of leading cloud providers). And less job seeker interest coupled with higher employer demand signals it’s a good time to step into a cloud computing career or take yours even higher. The post The latest cloud computing trends shaping the job market appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
  22. Lots of people are breaking into tech with non-tech backgrounds, but what if you want to make a transition within tech from software engineering to product management? The good news is that as a software engineer, you’re in a great position to move into product management. You have deep knowledge of the tech side of how products are built, know what it’s like to work closely with product managers and have plenty of transferable skills you can take with you. But as with every career change, you can’t just snap your fingers and be in a new role—even with all the advantages a SWE background gives you. It takes a lot of planning, learning, exploration and, let’s be real, courage. So to help you build a career roadmap for transitioning from engineering to product management, we talked to five product managers (many of whom have made the switch themselves) to get their takes on what it really means to be a PM and the best ways to move into the field. Table of contents Do you really want to be a product manager? Immerse yourself in the product world Stop thinking about code, start thinking about the customer Let your internal network know you’re interested in product management Pick up PM-related tasks in your current role Show off transferable product management skills (and fill any gaps) Do you really want to be a product manager? Before making any big moves, think about the motivations behind your career switch and if your goals, skills and personality match up with the realities of life as a product manager. Why do you want to change careers? Bruno Wasconcellos Roncolato, a product manager at Seen by Indeed, transitioned from software engineering to product management because he loved the technical side of his work, but also had a passion for the business side. He was fascinated by the psychological aspects of how you sell to people and why they use things. He also wanted to flex his strong communication skills more often. So for him, making the switch was about following his passions and natural talents. Matt Collins, who’s now involved in product management for software products, previously worked as a software engineer in Paris for a number of years, but says, “ started to feel I wanted more of a say in what we were creating rather than how we were creating it.” Another software engineer turned product manager, Jacky Liang, says, “My true passions intersect design, engineering, strategy and people. The more I read about product management, the more I knew it was the right fit for the next step in my career.” So before you make any career moves, assess why you want to be a product manager by asking yourself the following questions: Why are you drawn to product management? What don’t you like about being a software engineer? Would you be happier as an engineering manager or director of engineering? (The typical career path for a SWE) Are you good at explaining, persuading, negotiating and mediating? Do you enjoy solving customer problems over writing code as an individual contributor? Envision yourself in the role Before making the switch, it’s also important to think about some of the key differences between engineering and product management. As a PM, a big part of your job will be communicating across teams. You’ll be responsible for more decisions, spend more time in meetings and focus on what to build rather than how to build a product. Instead of solving technical problems, you’ll need to figure out what’s going to be built next sprint, next release, next quarter, next year, etc. Another key difference is that product managers aren’t told what to do. Instead, they figure out how to solve problems with very little direction. As Adam Ullrich, senior product manager at Indeed Hire, says “A lot of work on the tech side begins with a specific stated problem/prompt. But in reality, many of the environments we’re exploring are uncertain—you only see a piece of the puzzle.” Feeling accomplished can also be a much slower process. As a software engineer, you probably get a rush when you hit compile and your code works, or when you complete a sprint. But as a PM, a successful outcome can take several months or even years. According to Wasconcellos Roncolato, “As a product manager, you have zero authority, but you have to be a very strong influencer.” So even though you’ll have full responsibility for a product, you’ll probably have no real power to change things. Can you imagine yourself succeeding in this type of position? Tip: To further envision yourself in the role, think about (a) what you admire about your current PM and (b) what you would improve upon. Join Seen for free to get matched to a role in product management Immerse yourself in the product world Decided this career path is for you? Start expanding your knowledge of product management. Wasconcellos Roncolato recommends learning some of the lingo by reading up on agile, scrum and kanban. From there, it depends on which branch of product management you’re interested in: technical or marketing. If you’re interested in product marketing management, read up on marketing psychology. If you want to stay more technical (a great option for those with a tech background), learn about the problem space from a business perspective. Beyond that, read books and blog posts to stay up to date on new products and technologies, product management, UX design and growth hacking. Collins highly recommends reading Inspired (2nd edition) by Marty Cagan, calling it “the best book about product management that I know of.” Other blogs and books to check out include: Product Hunt Hacker News Mind the Product Product Coalition Cracking the PM Interview Don’t just consume content, create it yourself: Build a personal brand outside of work by blogging about product management, writing product case studies or publishing your thoughts on the industry. Stop thinking about code, start thinking about the customer As a product manager, getting close to the customer is as important as being close with the teams you’re working with. In fact, a study of product management job postings found that 49% said they were looking for PMs who can empathize with customers. “Product managers need to be able to develop a deep understanding of the target customers of their product and how the product can help them,” says Collins. “This means assembling information from a wide range of sources, including observing and interviewing customers themselves…” What are you helping your customers accomplish? Why are they using your product and not a competitor’s? Shifting from a code mindset to a customer mindset is important, but harder than you might think if you’re coming from a tech background. “It’s easy to get excited about the technical part of a problem instead of the product/value part,” says Ullrich. “Avoid that at all costs and build the thing that’ll get you learning the fastest—however ugly and suboptimal the code might seem. In an uncertain space, you’ll throw most of the code away anyway.” You need to learn to prioritize features based on the value they provide your customers or users, instead of engineering dependencies. Otherwise, having a tech background might actually work against you. Take it from Roman Pichler, web developer turned product management expert, “Don’t interfere with the development team’s autonomy by making technical decisions, which can be tempting for product owners with strong technical skills in my experience.” So learn to think from the customer’s point of view. How? Collins suggests you just start talking to your users. “If you do this already, do it more. Try to really, deeply understand how your software fits into their lives and, as a result, what small changes could have an outsized benefit for them.” Spend actual face time with your users and customers by asking a PM or someone on the sales team if you can tag along on their next customer visit. Read or answer customer support tickets to build empathy. Building your own product on the side can also help you start thinking more about the customer (i.e., you’ll perform customer research, prioritize requirements for an MVP, design and build it, show it to customers, ask for feedback). These side projects will “let you develop the skills you’ll need as a product manager and be a great thing to talk about in interviews to show you’re serious,” says Collins. Let your internal network know you’re interested in product management Try to make the switch at your current company if you can. You already know the product, the code behind it and how things get done at your company—and that’s a big advantage. Look at it this way: If you’re a software engineer at a small startup and your goal is to become a product manager at a FAANG company, don’t quit your startup job and immediately start applying for PM roles at Facebook or Netflix. These roles are probably out of reach without direct PM experience. Instead, work to get a product manager role at your current company to build up your resume, and then apply for a PM role at your dream company. Get the ball rolling by talking to your manager during your next 1:1 about your career goals. Lots of companies will help you develop a formal plan to structure your career path into a product management role. Tell your co-workers, especially the product managers, that you’re interested in making a career change. Set up informational interviews with PMs on your team to pick their brains about their typical week (you’ll probably find there’s no typical day) and find out what it’s like to be a PM at your company. Pick up PM-related tasks in your current role If you don’t have product management work experience on your resume, it can be hard for hiring managers to see you in the role. So find a way to work your product management muscles at work. After all, it’s easier to switch to a product manager role if you can develop PM-like thinking. If the informational interviews with your team’s PMs went well, ask if you can help them by taking on lower priority work they don’t currently have the bandwidth for: Ask if they need help with a competitive analysis or research assignment. Get involved in a roadmap or feature prioritization discussion. Join in when they’re interviewing users. Suggest the addition or removal of features. Sit in on product design meetings. Ullrich also suggests incorporating a product management mindset when working on your current software engineering projects. “Get clarity on what problem you’re trying to solve for the user and be a partner in defining the solution approach, not just the code,” he says. “Ask questions to help the team conceive of simpler alternatives that get out faster—e.g. does this need to be publicly accessible or can we get most of the benefit for a simpler subset of the population on the internal network?” Show off transferable product management skills (and fill any gaps) You might be surprised at how many of your tech skills are applicable to your new career. Here are some of the top skills a product manager needs to have (so you can identify gaps in your knowledge), as well as how you can make your engineering experience sound relevant to product management. The PM skills you need to master Software engineers have a great deal of hard skills, but shifting your attention to your soft skills is essential when making the switch to product management. These skills include empathy, strategic thinking, organization, prioritization, self-sufficiency and scrappiness. Communication is one of the most important. According to Wasconcellos Roncolato, “A good PM is a person who errs on the side of excessive communication, rather than lack of it.” In fact, 71% of companies want PMs that can clearly write and articulate ideas. He also says that PMs must be open to criticism and accept that they’ll fail and be wrong a lot. Beyond that, you have to be a trustworthy person, as people will only open up about the good, the bad, etc. if they trust you—and that’s how you make better products. Repositioning your tech skills as product management skills One of the hardest parts about shifting careers is tailoring your resume to your new role and highlighting the right experiences in interviews. However, your tech skills give you a huge advantage. In fact, Wasconcellos Roncolato says that having a tech background actually got him into the field of product management. But how can you spin your resume to reflect PM skills (without years of PM experience)? According to Liang, “Whereas an engineer would list the languages and features [they’ve] implemented, a PM resume focuses on the leadership and impact they have had in an organization or project.” In other words, focus on the soft skills. Here are some of the transferable skills you can take with you from software engineering to product management: The ability to communicate effectively with engineering teams: 95% of product manager job postings require PMs to work alongside software engineers, so lean on your strengths and embrace your ability to speak the same language as engineers. As Wasconcellos Roncolato puts it, “Your technical skills will help you translate whatever business requirements you have into a better conversation with engineers.” Analytical skills: According to Collins, “As a software developer, you tend to get pretty good at analysis—investigating why a piece of software is behaving strangely, for example. These analytical skills lend themselves very well to product management where you often need to look at problems from a number of different angles, figuring out how to have the greatest impact to improve a product for your customers.” Creativity, innovation and curiosity: Take it from Ullrich: “I think a big part of product management is maximizing the rate at which you can learn. I think tech skills are incredibly valuable because they enable you to conceive of different approaches that might get you learning faster.” Planning and resource estimation: With an engineering background you can estimate times more accurately, make better tradeoffs and have a much better idea of the level of effort needed to implement an idea. “Having a tech background makes it possible to quickly estimate how complex or trivial an implementation could be,” says Ullrich, “In the best case, you can redefine how to explore a new area in a way that sidesteps the complexity.” Making the switch from software engineer to product manager Many software engineers are able to successfully transition into product management due to their transferable skills and extensive experience with tech teams. But you still have to put in the work to land a product manager role. Passion is the first step. As Collins says, “The more you believe in what you’re working on, the more motivated you’ll be to really understand your users and the problem you’re solving for them, and the better the product you’ll end up creating.” The post How to become a product manager (when you’re a software engineer) appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
  23. There will likely always be a talent shortage in tech, especially since only 15.2% of developers were actively looking for a new job in 2019. But that doesn’t mean happily employed tech professionals aren’t willing to talk about new opportunities. In fact, almost three-fourths are. So where are the nearly 60% of developers who make up this passive candidate pool? With 50M+ unique visitors every month, Stack Overflow is the online coding community where people of all skill levels go to solve coding problems, learn new tech skills and collaborate with fellow techies. Unlike traditional sourcing on job boards, professional networking sites or even GitHub, uncovering (and wooing) the right candidates on Stack Overflow isn’t always straightforward. However, with a few simple strategies, you can find the tech candidates that other employers are missing out on. Note: While there are a couple of paid options for sourcing tech talent on Stack Overflow, we’ll be covering how to do it for free. Is Stack Overflow better than a resume? Resumes alone aren’t always the best indicator of a person’s experience and skills (particularly soft skills). A Stack Overflow profile, however, can give you a better idea of what a candidate can actually do, instead of what they want recruiters to see. This can help alleviate the burden of trying to spot exaggerations or false claims on a resume, which 40% of employers say is their biggest hiring challenge. As a popular Q&A site for developers to find, ask and answer programming questions (similar to Quora, but for tech-related questions only), Stack Overflow shows off a person’s open source projects, favorite technologies, personal blog posts, peer-reviewed answers to complex programming questions, the communities they’re involved in and much more. And since coders here aren’t necessarily looking for a job, it’s also a great place to source candidates who don’t already have an inbox overflowing with recruiter messages. Hundreds of tech hirers tell us how they attract top talent: download the report now How to source tech candidates on Stack Overflow Unlike GitHub and other alternative sourcing channels, Stack Overflow’s internal search is very limited. You can’t search for candidates by location and even Boolean “X-ray” searches on Google don’t return results like they did a few years ago. This is good news, though, since by using the techniques below, you’d be one of the few recruiters sourcing on the platform (or at least doing it effectively). Search by questions and answers Since location isn’t a valid search parameter, this first method works best if you’re sourcing remote workers, if your company offers relocation packages or if you’re based in a popular tech hub. Start by going to https://stackoverflow.com/. In the search bar, type in the programming language(s) you want a candidate to know in brackets. These are known as “tags” and you can search by one, or as many as you’d like. For example, if you’re looking for a candidate who knows SQL, Python and pandas, you’d type “ [python] [pandas]” into the search bar. This returns questions that contain those tags (604 in total for this particular search), which you can whittle down by adding more detail to your search query. Adding “answers:4” to your search query, for instance, will return only the questions that have at least four answers, which narrows our results down to 18 questions. You can also add “score:3” for questions with a score of at least three. (Question scores are calculated based on the number of upvotes minus the number of downvotes.) Your search query should now look like this: “[sql] [python] [pandas] answers:4 score:3”. This gets us down to a much more manageable eight results. You can then filter to see the questions with the most votes. If you’re searching by just one tag, you can also click on “Top users” to see the top answerers and askers for that tag, both in the last 30 days and of all time. On the right-hand side, you’ll also see related tags (i.e., people who know this skill might also know these skills), which you can use to expand your search. You’ve found some questions, so now it’s time to find potential candidates. Click on a question and navigate to a user’s profile—either the person who asked the question, or someone who answered it. We’ll talk about what you should be looking for in a user’s profile in the next section. Write a custom SQL query While Stack Overflow’s search function can be tricky to customize, all of the site’s data is available on the Stack Exchange Data Explorer, which offers a query tool for analyzing that data. But don’t worry. You won’t need to hire a SQL developer to try this method. Shane Gryzko, a UX designer with a background in software development, created a SQL query you can use to find candidates based on both location and skill. All you need to do is type in a location and any tag in the search menu and you’ll get a list of the top users for that skill in the location where you’re hiring. You can also create your own SQL query for Stack Overflow using a query generator. All you have to do is enter what you’re looking for (e.g., location, skill, experience level) and it will create a SQL query for you. Then, copy/paste the query into Stack Exchange Data Explorer and run it to get a list of candidates that match your requirements—no actual coding required. What to look for on a Stack Overflow user’s profile When you find a few prospective candidates you like, qualify them for your open role(s) by looking through their profile. You’ll often find a short bio that describes what they do and what their job title is, their location, social media handles, etc., but here’s what else you should be paying attention to in order to make sure a candidate is a match. Asked (and answered) questions Toggle to the Activity tab on a user’s profile to find out what questions they’re interacting with, including how many questions they’ve asked and answered. You can sort by number of votes to see their most popular questions and answers, or by date to see their most recent activity. This can give you an idea of the depth and breadth of their tech expertise. If they’ve only answered two questions, for instance, they may not be as experienced as someone who’s answered 50. If they’ve been active for several years, they might be more experienced than someone who’s only been answering questions for the past few months. Looking at a potential candidate’s questions and answers can also give you insight into their communication skills and style, including how they explain complex concepts, address others and ask for advice. In the example answer below, you can tell right away that the person has a deep understanding of the subject matter just by the way it’s written. The best part? You don’t have to understand any of the tech concepts yourself. Not only that, but reviewing questions and answers can give you something to talk about in your initial outreach message. If you notice that a user has answered several questions about parsers, for instance, you could say something like: “I can tell from your Stack Overflow profile that you know what you’re talking about when it comes to parser libraries and grammars. That’s exactly what we’re looking for in our Principal Software Engineer role that just opened up at Company ABC.” Top tags Within the Activity tab, you can also see a user’s top skills and technologies, which are reflected by the top tags in their profile. Click on each to see the questions they’ve asked and answered with those tags. To get an understanding of their level of expertise with each skill, look at the numbers to the left and right of each tag. The small number to the left is the number of votes the user has received for questions and answers with that tag. To the right is how many questions they’ve asked or answered with that tag. Badges Stack Overflow users can earn bronze, silver and gold badges for answering questions, asking questions and more. Here’s a list of all the badges available on Stack Overflow, along with how many have been awarded to give you an idea of a badge’s rarity. For example, the Great Question badge (a question score of 100 or more) has been awarded 36.2k times. Since stack Overflow has 11M+ registered users, it’s a pretty rare badge. You can find a user’s badges within the Activity tab under Badges. Reputation points Users can earn (or lose) reputation points when fellow coders upvote or downvote their questions, answers and edits. That means people with high reputation scores ask good questions and provide valuable answers, as reviewed by their peers. You can use reputation points to measure a candidate’s knowledge, as well as how trusted they are within the tech community. For reference, reputations range from 1 to 25,000+ (one person on Stack Overflow has a reputation of over one million). An “established user” who’s been participating on the site for a good amount of time has around 1,000 points. You might even see a label next to someone’s name that indicates their reputation ranking (over the past year or all time)—i.e., “top x% this year” or “top x% overall.” This can give you an idea of how they rank against others. Keep in mind that while users with five- or six-digit reputation scores typically have industry-leading expertise, their high visibility might also mean they’re being inundated with recruiter messages on a daily basis. In contrast, those with reputation scores in the lower thousands will probably have less experience, but be more receptive to your outreach. Reaching out to Stack Overflow users Stack Overflow explicitly tells its users that they won’t get “recruiter spam.” So to avoid being flagged, contact potential candidates outside the Stack Overflow platform (e.g., Seen, LinkedIn, GitHub, email) and never leave job solicitations in the comments section of a question. Before reaching out, you might also notice that a lot of Stack Overflow users don’t use their full name or choose to go by a screen name. All you have to do is look on the far right side of a user’s profile to find their Twitter, GitHub and/or personal website, which you can cross-reference to find their full name and contact info Once you’ve found a way to contact them, it’s time to craft an outreach message. Since no one wants to feel like they’re part of an email blast that’s been sent to hundreds of people, follow the basics of effective cold outreach. It could mean the difference between a candidate responding to your message, or ignoring it. Disclose the company you’re recruiting for, make sure the role is relevant to the candidate’s interests and write like a human. Be sure to personalize your message to immediately set a rapport with the candidate (e.g., “I saw your answer on Stack Overflow…”). You could also add links to members of the dev team’s Stack Overflow profiles. A sourcing channel overflowing with tech talent Tech candidates are in such high demand that you can’t rely solely on traditional sourcing methods to find the talent you need. The key? Source passive tech pros who aren’t visiting job boards or actively applying for roles by meeting them where they are: Stack Overflow. The good news is that many tech candidates on Stack Overflow are highly receptive to recruiters for two main reasons: (1) Most haven’t already been inundated with recruiter emails and (2) They’ll appreciate more personalized outreach from you thanks to unique insights you gathered from their user profile. You can also find the candidates you’re looking for with Seen, which provides a way to source both active and passive candidates by skills, experience, location and more. The post How to source tech talent on Stack Overflow appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
  24. Today’s post comes courtesy of Blind’s new service—Rooftop Slushie—a career consultancy platform where employees at big tech companies provide interview, resume and offer evaluation advice. Like Blind, Rooftop Slushie is a move to increase transparency in the workplace. Verified professionals anonymously share information to help others make better decisions in their professional lives. Making a career change soon? Hold up—we’ve asked a handful of senior FAANG employees heavily involved with the hiring process to help you with your next behavioral interview round. Take a look at what they had to say (usernames have been used to protect anonymity, but you’ll find the companies on the user’s profile page). What’s your weakness? “Please don’t take the Michael Scott approach and turn this into a backhanded compliment (‘My biggest weakness is that I care too much’). I’d highly recommend giving an honest answer, and one that is as specific as possible and not handwavy. This shows that you’re self-aware and are able to independently identify areas for personal growth. Everyone has areas they need to work on and the interviewer knows this. Some potentially good answers: (1) I’ve been happy with my unit tests for regression coverage, but would like to invest more in systems-level integration testing to protect against things like service downtime and API version changes. (2) As a manager, I’m learning how to strike a balance between delegating enough, and not too much or too little. I want to stay hands-on, and trust in my own ability to deliver, but it’s also important that I give my team technical opportunities. On the other hand, I don’t want to delegate too much since I like to lead from the front.” — Dios, Engineering Manager “You need to pick just one weakness, and when thinking about your answer, keep in mind these two overarching principles: (1) Your weakness is fixable and you need to let the manager know that you know how and are actively working on improvement. (2) Your weakness should hint about your strength. Weakness does not necessarily mean you are not good, it can be because you are so good at something at the expense of another, which is your weakness. Simple examples: productivity vs. quality; great team player vs. speaking up.” — Max, Software Engineer Tell me about a project you worked on. “For all significant projects you’ve worked on, explicitly highlight what YOU contributed, and what you built, even if it was as part of a team. We want to understand YOUR contributions, and what value you delivered to the project. Have concrete metrics, understanding of the timelines involved, as well as trade-offs made. The best answers also reflect what you could have done differently to better improve the outcome of the project.” — sHvN64, Senior Software Engineer and Tech Lead “Make sure you focus on what the challenges were, and how you overcome the challenges. The tricky part is to describe your project in such a way that is easy to follow and at the same time sounds complex enough. My personal experience is, many candidates’ challenges were either hard to follow or did not sound challenging enough. Give enough context and avoid acronyms—the hiring manager may not be an expert in the area of your project! In the end, talk about what your takeaway is. What did you learn from the experience?” — Max, Software Engineer What do you do if you disagree with your boss? “Use data to win arguments. Can you tell a story about using product data to bring objective data to a subjective debate? Express empathy. Good answers will sound more like ‘I think doing it this way is more in-line with our goals, and here’s why’, and less like ‘I think you’re wrong and that’s a bad idea.’ Highlight that debate and disagreement is healthy and improve teams. Of course there is a healthy debate and unhealthy debate. Make it really clear that you use disagreements as an opportunity to learn OR influence others, not to win arguments. Step back and understand everyone’s point of view. Perhaps there’s a good reason for the disagreement that you can learn from. Maybe there are other factors worth considering. This will help take some of the emotion out of the conversation and bring you back to a rational place.” — Dios, Engineering Manager “This is a time to show how you are able to resolve conflicts at work and drive consensus with someone who is a power figure. To answer this question, you should first set the context on (1) what you disagreed with your manager’s position, (2) how you didn’t confront immediately and rather took a small pilot test to verify your hypothesis and (3) how you used data to convince them that your idea’s worth exploring. For example, the manager says to focus on sales and acquisition of new customers when you want to woo existing customers as well. You notice an attrition of customers after the first few days, so you try an experiment to engage the existing customer base through product feature emails. You observe that these customers have a much higher retention and revenue in the long run. Ultimately, this allows you to convince your manager that the strategy should focus on both acquisition as well as engagement.” — A, Product Leader Why do you want to come to our company? “The one thing that you need to show is how much you know about the company. A lot of times, managers ask this to gauge the interest of a candidate. If a candidate is highly interested in the company, the person should know a lot about what the company does and the latest news of the company. Make sure you read through the company’s website, social media page and blogs. You can pick certain examples from what you read and expand around those examples.” — Max, Software Engineer “Aim to have a specific and rehearsed answer. What about our company uniquely and specifically interests you? Are we using a cool piece of technology at scale? Building a product that you care about better than anybody else?” — Dios, Engineering Manager Why do you want to leave your company? “My strategy to answer this question is always very simple: stay positive and avoid the negative. I tell them that I do not want to leave my current company as I am enjoying my job a lot. Having said that, I am keen to learn more about the bigger scope, higher complexity and the interesting challenges in the role offered by the other company. I always mention my excitement after reading the job description, how it felt like a great next step in my career and how I am using the interview opportunity to better understand the details. Finally, even if there are other genuine reasons to make the switch (higher pay, better location, etc.), this is not the right time to mention them.” — A, Product Leader The post FAANG hiring managers share how to answer behavioral interview questions appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article
  25. Would you trade the hustle and bustle of a big city (or the place you call home) for small-town living, a place without a big tech scene or even the arctic tundra…in exchange for up to $15,000, student loan forgiveness or free land? As tech workers flock to large metros like San Francisco and New York, quieter, more rural areas are facing slowing population growth or even decline. To reverse the trend, several places in the United States (and even remote Greek islands) are getting creative to entice workers, particularly tech pros, to move there and revitalize their economies. And instead of trying to woo big-name companies with millions in tax breaks, these places are offering individual workers thousands in incentives to either come and work for employers based in the area or bring their laptops and take up remote work. While these places may be smaller or more isolated than your typical tech hub, many have thriving, tight-knit tech communities—and bigger cities are often just a short drive away. So if you’re looking to relocate (or are tired of battling traffic and spending the majority of your paycheck on rent), why not head to one of these nine places in the US that will pay you to move there? 1. Alaska Alaskans have been getting paid to live there since 1976—and it’s not to cover the costs of thermals. The state’s Permanent Fund Dividend divides 25% of the state’s oil revenues each year among its permanent residents, even children. This amount averages around $1,200 per person each year, but has been as high as $2,072 in 2015. In 2018, each Alaskan received $1,606, which means a family of four received $6,424. Despite being the most sparsely populated state (and having winter temperatures in the -30°s and -40°s), Alaska’s tech startup scene is warming up. Tech accelerator Launch Alaska, for instance, works alongside startups in the area to solve challenges surrounding food, water, transportation and energy. And in the middle of the Alaskan wilderness, one entrepreneur bootstrapped her beauty startup in a log cabin, proving that remote work is possible here, especially if you love jaw-dropping views and plenty of open space. What’s the catch? You must be a resident of Alaska for at least one year (and be present in the state for at least 190 days of that year) with no felony convictions. It’s also important to take note of the cost of living, which is more expensive than many other states. Anchorage’s COL, for instance, is 28% higher than the rest of the US. Join Seen for free to get matched with a remote tech role that lets you work anywhere 2. Hamilton, Ohio This Midwestern town is offering up to $10,000 ($300 per month for 30 months) to help young professionals pay down their student debts. Known as a “reverse scholarship,” the city’s Talent Attraction Program (TAP) Scholarship awards students after they’ve graduated, with the goal of turning the city’s urban core into a more attractive place for young transplants to live and work—especially those still carrying student loan debt. Since it’s less than a 45-minute drive from Cincinnati (ranked #4 for highest software architect salaries), Hamilton is close to all the amenities of a big city, but still retains its small-town charm with just 63,000 residents. Want to feel connected to a bigger tech community? Attend one of the many meetups, conferences or startup weekends in nearby Cincinnati or Dayton. What’s the catch? It’s only available to people who’ve graduated with a STEAM degree in the last seven years and who still have at least $5,000 in outstanding student debt. Plus, you can’t already be living in Hamilton, and you must have a job lined up in Butler County (where Hamilton is located). 3. Harmony, Minnesota Looking to put down roots in a quiet town? Harmony, Minnesota offers cash rebates for people looking to build a brand new home (ranging from $5,000 to $12,000)—based on the home’s final estimated market value. Dubbed the “biggest little town in Southeast Minnesota,” Harmony isn’t what typically comes to mind when you think of tech. In fact, the town of less than a thousand people is actually home to the largest Amish community in the state, a group not known for their modern tech adoption. Yet, Harmony is a great (and affordable) place to live especially if you’re a remote tech worker. Minneapolis is only about 130 miles north if you crave the big city feel every once and awhile, and that means big tech events, like the Twin Cities Software Symposium, are only a few hours away. What’s the catch? There are no restrictions or limits on an applicant’s age, income level or residency, but you must agree to live in the home—i.e., you can’t turn around and immediately rent out your new home or sell it. 4. Maine Through its Educational Opportunity Tax Credit program, Maine will help you pay off your student loans by deducting money from your income tax bill up to a certain amount, depending on your major and degree type. For those who graduated with a bachelor’s degree in 2018, it’s $377 per month. For instance, if you owe $2,500 in state income taxes but you paid $2,000 in student loans during the year, you’ll owe Maine just $500. If you have a STEM degree, you’ll also get a check in the mail if the amount you paid in student loans exceeds your state income tax liability. So if you owe $2,500 in state income taxes, but you paid $3,000 in student loans, you’ll receive $500 from Maine. Looking to build a tech career here? Check out Portland, Maine, a quirky city just 100 miles north of Boston. With the highest concentration of life science companies in the state, it’s the perfect place if you’re interested in healthtech. The disruptive veterinarian app Covetrus, for example, was born here, as was the athletic training and fitness software company KinoTek, which uses motion capture and virtual reality to visualize the body’s muscles and the movements they generate. What’s the catch? It’s not just lobster. You must be a graduate from any college in the US, starting with the class of 2016. In order to get the deduction, you also have to live and work in Maine for at least nine months of the year. 5. Marquette, Kansas Can’t afford to buy a house in a big city? With a population of just 641, Marquette, Kansas is the perfect place to move if you’re truly looking for small-town living or want to trade apartment living for your dream home—without breaking the bank. It’s offering free lots of land (ranging from 11,000 to 25,000 square feet) to people who move there and build a house. A place where parents feel comfortable letting their kids play outside and walk to school, Marquette’s peaceful, quiet community and low cost of living make it a great place to raise a family. But just because it’s a tiny town doesn’t mean you can’t grow your tech career. While relocating to a town like Marquette is ideal for someone who works remotely, there are also opportunities in the nearby larger towns of Salina or McPherson, and Marquette is just an hour outside Wichita—the largest city in Kansas. What’s the catch? To qualify, you must agree to begin construction on your home within 120 days and finish building it within one year. You also have to commit to living in your new home for at least a year. 6. Newton, Iowa When you build a new home in Newton, Iowa, you’ll get $10,000 cash to spend on whatever you want, plus a “welcome” package worth over $3,000, which includes gift certificates from local businesses. A family-friendly community of 15,000, Newton boasts a cost of living that’s 21.9% lower than the US average and is home to an active arts community, with an annual sculpture festival and over 90 displays of public art dotted throughout the community. Like some of the other small cities on our list, Newton is probably best for remote workers, but is well within commutable distance (30 miles) to Des Moines, the most populous city in the state and a leader in both agricultural technology and insurtech. What’s the catch? This incentive only applies to new single-family homes worth $160,000 or more. 7. St. Clair County, Michigan St. Clair County, Michican is offering up to $15,000 (paid out on a quarterly basis) to help college grads with STEAM degrees pay off student debt through the county’s Come Home Award. Part of the Detroit-Warren-Dearborn, MI metro area, St. Clair County lies in the Thumb of eastern Michigan. The area is a great place for young entrepreneurs and tech pros due to its easy access to both city and country lifestyles. Plus, The Underground, a thriving incubator in downtown Port Huron, offers co-working spaces, seed money to fund startups and events, and workshops, which has made launching new businesses here a breeze. What’s the catch? You must be a college graduate with a STEAM degree (earned in the last 10 years) and have student debt. You can’t already be living in St. Clair County or be in the process of moving there, and you also must agree to live and work in the area and secure a job or create your own business within 120 days of receiving the award. 8. Tulsa, Oklahoma Already work remotely? Head to Tulsa. The city is offering remote workers $10,000 cash, a free desk at a co-working space in downtown Tulsa and networking opportunities through its Tulsa Remote program. You’ll get a chunk of the cash upfront to pay for relocation costs, a monthly stipend and the rest when you finish your first year there. The city wants to attract tech professionals who can build up the area’s tech and data science sectors in particular. We hope that this sparks more tech talent and gets entrepreneurial people to make Tulsa their home and pursue their career or ultimately start a new business,” says Ken Levit, executive director of the George Kaiser Family Foundation, which funds the program. What’s the catch? You must be over 18, eligible to work and live in the US and be able to relocate to Tulsa within six months. Plus, you must already be doing full-time remote work for a company based outside Tulsa County, or be self-employed. 9. Vermont When you think of Vermont, you probably think of colorful fall foliage, Ben & Jerry’s or maple syrup. But it’s also a great place for remote work (or finding a new full-time job). That’s because Vermont pays remote workers $10,000 ($5,000 per year for up to two years) to cover their remote working expenses (e.g., relocation costs, computer, internet, membership in a co-working space). However, in 2020, the program will expand beyond remote workers to people who move to Vermont and work for employers based in-state. Also launching in 2020 is Hula, a 150,000-square-foot campus that will soon be home to offices with Apple and Facebook vibes. More than 25 businesses have already expressed interest in setting up shop here, including OVR Technology, a South Burlington company that adds scents to virtual reality. And if new, state-of-the-art office space doesn’t convince you that Vermont’s tech ecosystem is growing, check out the Vermont Tech Jam, an annual job fair and tech expo that showcases the state’s most innovative tech companies. What’s the catch? You must be a full-time remote employee who’s incurred qualifying remote worker expenses. Or, you must move to Vermont on or after January 1, 2020 and work full-time for an employer located in Vermont. Is getting paid to move really worth it? Whether you’re a new grad, buying your first house or looking to boost your savings, any of these nine locations could soon be your new home. But before making any big moves, consider how salaries in these areas compare with salaries in your current city based on cost of living. It’s also important to weigh relocation costs against the city’s or state’s incentive. If the cost to relocate is higher than what they’re offering, it may not be worth it. And while tech jobs might be harder to find in a sleepy town where demand for tech workers is a lot lower, remote work is a viable option, big cities are often just a short commute away and there are tons of Slack communities you can join if you want to talk tech. You never know, you might be surprised by how much you enjoy living and working in a place you’d never considered before. The post Get paid $15,000 to move? 9 places that’ll pay you to live there appeared first on Seen by Indeed. View the full article